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RACIAL INTEGRATION IN THE ACCOUNTANCY PROFESSION IN ZIMBABWE TEN YEARS AFTER INDEPENDENCE: SOME PRELIMINARY FINDINGS

Jeffrey Kantor (University of Windsor Canada)
Linda Human (University of Cape Town South Africa)

Asian Review of Accounting

ISSN: 1321-7348

Article publication date: 1 January 1992

Abstract

The objective of this study was to research, a decade after Independence, the attitudes of a number of key actors in the accountancy profession in Zimbabwe to the integration and advancement of Blacks. A wide spectrum of views and opinions was sought, ranging from those of black students on the one hand to those of partners in accountancy firms on the other. The findings suggest that a great deal of work in the area of racial integration still needs to be done before it can be claimed that so‐called ‘black advancement’ in the accountancy profession has been successful. In particular, it would appear that many Whites still retain negative expectations of Blacks and that little is being done to actively understand and redress the major barriers to integration.

Citation

Kantor, J. and Human, L. (1992), "RACIAL INTEGRATION IN THE ACCOUNTANCY PROFESSION IN ZIMBABWE TEN YEARS AFTER INDEPENDENCE: SOME PRELIMINARY FINDINGS", Asian Review of Accounting, Vol. 1 No. 1, pp. 99-116. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb046316

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1992, MCB UP Limited