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The Elementary Theory of Aero‐Elasticity: A Series of Articles Written from the Standpoint of a Structural Engineer for Students and Junior Members of Aircraft Design Teams

E.G. Broadbent, M.A., A.F.R.Ae.S. (Structures Department, U.A.E., Fnrnlioroupji.)

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology

ISSN: 0002-2667

Article publication date: 1 April 1954

Abstract

IN Part I wc saw how structural flexibility could introduce aerodynamic forces which might eventually lead to instability, or to the complete nullification of a desired aerodynamic effect. The phenomenon of flutter presents another problem in stability, but in this case an oscillatory instability is threatened. It must be realized at the outset that flutter is no mere resonance phenomenon such as the bad vibrations a motor‐car may exhibit at a particular engine speed. Flutter is a vibration in which energy is extracted from the airstrcam to help build up the amplitude, and a catastrophic failure can easily occur within a second of the start of the flutter.

Citation

Broadbent, E.G. (1954), "The Elementary Theory of Aero‐Elasticity: A Series of Articles Written from the Standpoint of a Structural Engineer for Students and Junior Members of Aircraft Design Teams", Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Vol. 26 No. 4, pp. 113-121. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb032411

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1954, MCB UP Limited