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High Altitude Flying: The Physical Effects of Great Heights and the Means Used for Overcoming Them

C.J. Stewart, O.B.E., Wh.Ex., F.R.Ae.S., M.I.Mech.E. (Head of the Instrument Section at Farnborough)

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology

ISSN: 0002-2667

Article publication date: 1 April 1931

Abstract

IN the later stages of the War, aerial maoœuvres at high altitude became increasingly frequent for well‐defined reasons, and, since the War, the tendency has been to provide certain types of aircraft capable of a rapid climb to heights in excess of 25,000 ft. Much work on high‐altitude flying has been done in this and other countries, and notably in the United States, where the present height record of 43,166 ft. is held. This climb was achieved on June 4, 1930, by Lt. Soucck, U.S.N. in an Apache aeroplane. The previous record of 41,794 ft. was held by a German pilot, Willy Neuenhofen, flying a Junkers monoplane. What these figures mean and how they were calculated need not be discussed, for the heights are so huge as to make any comment unnecessary, and when the difficulties of maintaining engine power, effective breathing, necessary warmth of the pilot, and the freedom of controls in temperatures approximating to 90 deg. F. of frost are considered, the performances stand out as unique in technical skill and physical endurance.

Citation

Stewart, C.J. (1931), "High Altitude Flying: The Physical Effects of Great Heights and the Means Used for Overcoming Them", Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Vol. 3 No. 4, pp. 87-92. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb029386

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1931, MCB UP Limited