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APPLICATIONS OF DEM TO PROCESS ENGINEERING PROBLEMS

COLIN THORNTON (Civil Engineering Department, Aston University, Aston Triangle. Birmingham B4 7ET, UK)

Engineering Computations

ISSN: 0264-4401

Article publication date: 1 February 1992

Abstract

Although computer simulated experimentation using the distinct element method (DEM) was originally developed as a tool for examining geomechanical problems, the dynamic nature of the methodology used lends itself more readily to many other areas of scientific and industrial interest. One such area is that of process engineering in which large volumes of particulate materials have to be handled in the context of flow problems (e.g. chutes, hoppers, and pipes). In addition, these particulate materials are often in the form of powders which themselves are agglomerations of much smaller sized particles. Processes such as agglomeration and agglomerate breakdown, either by attrition or comminution, are also amenable to investigation by the DEM.

Citation

THORNTON, C. (1992), "APPLICATIONS OF DEM TO PROCESS ENGINEERING PROBLEMS", Engineering Computations, Vol. 9 No. 2, pp. 289-297. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb023867

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1992, MCB UP Limited