To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

FOUNDATIONS AND EVIDENCE FOR AN INTERACTION‐BASED FLICT NEGOTIATION

Paul J. Taylor (University of Liverpool, UK Department of Psychology, Eleanor Rathbone Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK, L69 7ZA. E‐mail: pjtaylor@liverpool.ac.uk)
Ian Donald (University of Liverpool, UK)

International Journal of Conflict Management

ISSN: 1044-4068

Article publication date: 1 March 2003

Abstract

This paper outlines 4 assumptions behind attempts to explain the sequential organization of communication behavior during conflict. These assumptions were supported by an analysis of behavioral sequences coded from 9 hostage negotiations and 20 divorce mediations. Analyses showed that negotiators use only a small proportion of available responses to other party's behavior, and that this proportion rapidly decreases as sequence length increases. Critical to this channeling in behavior was the triple‐interact (i.e., cue‐response‐cue‐response), which represents the maximum sequence length required to enable accurate prediction of negotiators' future behavior. More detailed analysis showed that the triple‐interact reduced uncertainty in behavior by over 70%, which compares to less than 1% from knowledge of negotiation context and approximately 10% from knowledge of individual differences.

Citation

Taylor, P.J. and Donald, I. (2003), "FOUNDATIONS AND EVIDENCE FOR AN INTERACTION‐BASED FLICT NEGOTIATION", International Journal of Conflict Management, Vol. 14 No. 3/4, pp. 213-232. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb022899

Publisher

:

MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 2003, MCB UP Limited