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DO JUSTICE PERCEPTIONS INFLUENCE STYLES OF HANDLING CONFLICT WITH SUPERVISORS?: WHAT JUSTICE PERCEPTIONS, PRECISELY?

M. Afzalur Rahim (Western Kentucky University)
Nace R. Magner (Western Kentucky University)
Debra L. Shapiro (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

International Journal of Conflict Management

ISSN: 1044-4068

Article publication date: 1 January 2000

Abstract

In a study consisting of 202 currently‐employed undergraduate students, we examined relationships between employees' perceptions of organizational justice and the styles they use for managing conflict with their supervisors. Regression analysis of questionnaire data indicated that distributive, procedural, and interactional justice were generally positively related to the use of more cooperative conflict management styles (i.e., integrating, obliging, and compromising). Two 2‐way interaction effects were observed as well, such that higher interactional justice was related to greater use of the integrating style primarily when distributive justice was low and procedural justice was high. Additionally, distributive justice was positively related to use of the avoiding style. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

Citation

Afzalur Rahim, M., Magner, N.R. and Shapiro, D.L. (2000), "DO JUSTICE PERCEPTIONS INFLUENCE STYLES OF HANDLING CONFLICT WITH SUPERVISORS?: WHAT JUSTICE PERCEPTIONS, PRECISELY?", International Journal of Conflict Management, Vol. 11 No. 1, pp. 9-31. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb022833

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 2000, MCB UP Limited