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A TEST OF THE MOTIVATIONS UNDERLYING CHOICE OF CONFLICT STRATEGIES IN THE DUAL‐CONCERN MODEL

Ritch L. Sorenson (Texas Tech University)
Eric A. Morse (University of Victoria)
Grant T. Savage (University of Alabama)

International Journal of Conflict Management

ISSN: 1044-4068

Article publication date: 1 January 1999

3238

Abstract

Dual‐concern models suggest that “concern about self” and “concern about other” motivate individuals to choose conflict‐handling strategies. We test those assumptions with a study of the cognitions associated with the choice of conflict strategies. Consistent with dual‐concern model conceptualizations, regression analyses that account for up to 41% of variance indicate that concern about self and concern about other are significantly associated with dominating and obliging strategies. However, predicted interactions between concern about self and concern about other and avoiding, compromising, and integrating strategies are not consistent with conceptualizations in dual‐concern models. Results from this study suggest the need for a conflict‐handling model with dimensions that account for more of the variance in the choices to avoid, compromise, and integrate.

Citation

Sorenson, R.L., Morse, E.A. and Savage, G.T. (1999), "A TEST OF THE MOTIVATIONS UNDERLYING CHOICE OF CONFLICT STRATEGIES IN THE DUAL‐CONCERN MODEL", International Journal of Conflict Management, Vol. 10 No. 1, pp. 25-44. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb022817

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1999, MCB UP Limited

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