To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

The Political Economy of John Stuart Mill or, The Co‐existence of Orthodoxy, Heresy and Prophecy

J. Ph. Platteau (Faculté Universitaires, Notre Dame de la Paix, Namur)

International Journal of Social Economics

ISSN: 0306-8293

Article publication date: 1 January 1985

Abstract

During the last three decades, thanks to the efforts of J. Schumpeter, G. Stigler, M. Blaug, P. Schwartz, T.W. Hutchison and others, a revaluation of the contribution of John Stuart Mill to the history of economic doctrines in general and to that of economic analysis in particular has taken place on a quite significant scale. The basic portrayal of J.S. Mill as an unoriginal and incoherent writer which prevailed from about the time of his death till around the middle of the present century came to be seriously and, one may say, successfully challenged. While the “eclecticism” of Mill was traditionally emphasised with a pejorative tone, no less than M. Blaug concluded that in the final analysis, it “worked to Mill's advantage” and that “the multiplicity of analytical ideas, often running in opposite directions, opened the way to subsequent refinement and development” (Blaug, 1968, p. 220). The theoretical inventiveness of J.S. Mill was stressed in still louder terms by G. Stigler when he wrote that “he was one of the most original economists in the history of the science” (Stigler, 1955, p. 7).

Citation

Platteau, J.P. (1985), "The Political Economy of John Stuart Mill or, The Co‐existence of Orthodoxy, Heresy and Prophecy", International Journal of Social Economics, Vol. 12 No. 1, pp. 3-26. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb013981

Publisher

:

MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1985, MCB UP Limited