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Aid Dependence and The Structure Of Corruption: The Case of Post‐Korean War South Korea

John Lie (University of Illinois at Urbana‐Champaign)

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy

ISSN: 0144-333X

Article publication date: 1 November 1997

Abstract

From 1953 to 1961, the South Korean economy grew slowly; the average per capita GNP growth was a mere percent, amounting to less than $100 in 1961. Few people, therefore, look for the sources of later dynamism in this period. As Kyung Cho Chung (1956:225) wrote in the mid‐1950s: “[South Korea] faces grave economic difficulties. The limitations imposed by the Japanese have been succeeded by the division of the country, the general destruction incurred by the Korean War, and the attendant dislocation of the population, which has further disorganized the economy” (see also McCune 1956:191–192). T.R. Fehrenbach (1963:37), in his widely read book on the Korean War, prognosticated: “By themselves, the two halves [of Korea] might possibly build a viable economy by the year 2000, certainly not sooner.”

Citation

Lie, J. (1997), "Aid Dependence and The Structure Of Corruption: The Case of Post‐Korean War South Korea", International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Vol. 17 No. 11/12, pp. 48-89. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb013331

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1997, MCB UP Limited