THE ONE‐CHILD POLICY AND PARENT‐CHILD RELATIONSHIPS: A COMPARISON OF ONE‐CHILD WITH MULTIPLE‐CHILD FAMILIES IN CHINA

Esther Ngan‐ling Chow (The American University)
S. Michael Zhao (Westat, Inc.)

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy

ISSN: 0144-333X

Publication date: 1 December 1996

Abstract

Facing a high birth rate, a falling mortality rate, and inconsistent policies on family planning from the 1950s to the early 1970s, the People's Republic of China (PRC) launched its widely known one‐child policy in 1979. The intention was to restrict population growth by reducing fertility through family planning and thereby to conserve the nation's resources to advance economic development. The effectiveness of the one‐child policy has varied greatly because policy regulations are differentially carried out by officials of provinces, municipalities, counties, communes, and minority regions. Generally speaking, the state policy has had greater acceptance in urban areas but is far less rigidly enforced by local officials in rural areas and for certain national minorities, which can have a second child under certain circumstances (Chow and Chen, 1994).

Citation

Ngan‐ling Chow, E. and Zhao, S. (1996), "THE ONE‐CHILD POLICY AND PARENT‐CHILD RELATIONSHIPS: A COMPARISON OF ONE‐CHILD WITH MULTIPLE‐CHILD FAMILIES IN CHINA", International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Vol. 16 No. 12, pp. 35-62. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb013285

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1996, MCB UP Limited

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