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British Food Journal Volume 17 Issue 3 1915

British Food Journal

ISSN: 0007-070X

Article publication date: 1 March 1915

Abstract

In discussing the subject of bread, or indeed any subject, one is of course confronted by the initial difficulty of definition. Nothing is harder than to define any concrete thing, no matter how common and well‐known it may be. This is not surprising when we remember that no one has ever succeeded in defining a definition. Perhaps the best attempt to do so is Pascal's, in the “Port Royal Logic,” and it is easy to drive a coach and six through the rules which he lays down for definitions to conform to. The only things that can be strictly defined are mathematical abstractions, such as a circle, which are formed on natural objects by pruning away their multitudinous properties till only two or three which can be expressed by a short and indisputable definition are left.

Citation

(1915), "British Food Journal Volume 17 Issue 3 1915", British Food Journal, Vol. 17 No. 3, pp. 41-60. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb011040

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1915, MCB UP Limited