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Looking Inside the “Glass Walls”: The Case of Women on the Industrial Sales Force

Lucette B. Comer (Assistant Professor, Department of Consumer Sciences and Retailing, Purdue University, 214‐E Matthews Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.)
Tanya Drollinger (Doctoral Candidate, Department of Consumer Sciences and Retailing, Purdue University, 214‐E Matthews Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.)

Equal Opportunities International

ISSN: 0261-0159

Article publication date: 1 April 1997

Abstract

For the past several decades women have been moving into the United States workforce in greater numbers and they have been gaining access to the types of jobs that were, traditionally, performed exclusively by men. Despite this progress, they are still having difficulty penetrating the so‐called “glass ceiling” into upper management positions (Alimo‐Metcalfe 1993; Tavakolian 1993). Many reasons have been advanced, but the most compelling of these concerns the “glass walls” that support the “glass ceiling”. The “glass walls” refer to those invisible barriers that limit the ability of women and minorities to gain access to the type of job that would place them in a position to break through the “glass ceiling” (Townsend 1996). If women are to gain parity with men in the workforce, they need to succeed in the positions that lie inside the “glass walls” that will enable them to rise through the “glass ceiling” to upper management.

Citation

Comer, L.B. and Drollinger, T. (1997), "Looking Inside the “Glass Walls”: The Case of Women on the Industrial Sales Force", Equal Opportunities International, Vol. 16 No. 4, pp. 1-18. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb010687

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1997, MCB UP Limited