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WOMEN IN BUSINESS: FAST TRACK DERAILMENT

Sherrill L. Gregory (Assistant Controller for Fritz Duda Company in Orange, California)
Brian H. Kleiner (Professor of Management, School of Business Administration and Economics, California State University, Fullerton.)

Equal Opportunities International

ISSN: 0261-0159

Article publication date: 1 June 1991

Abstract

With the feminist movement of the late 1960‘s and early 1970’s, “fast track” women eagerly sought advancement within male‐dominated Corporate America. By 1990 women succeeded in entry‐level and middle‐manager positions, but failed, with few notable exceptions, to make substantial gains in upper echelons. Many reasons for the failure exist, including family considerations, stubborn cultural and gender biases, and a lack of adequate training and educational opportunities. In response, and in frustration, many women have turned to entrepreneurship as a way to succeed at the top. Changing demographics, such as the new cultural and ethnic diversity, will open the upper level corporate doors for women as white males become the new minority entrant to the work force. The fast track derailment experienced by women over the past twenty years is temporary, and will begin to change by the end of the 1990's.

Citation

Gregory, S.L. and Kleiner, B.H. (1991), "WOMEN IN BUSINESS: FAST TRACK DERAILMENT", Equal Opportunities International, Vol. 10 No. 6, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb010557

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1991, MCB UP Limited