Supply chain opportunities in high-speed electronics a strategic review of PCB, material and interconnection trends and needs for electronic assemblies for high-speed telecom, datacom networks and high-end computers 2009-2014

Circuit World

ISSN: 0305-6120

Article publication date: 20 November 2009

77

Citation

(2009), "Supply chain opportunities in high-speed electronics a strategic review of PCB, material and interconnection trends and needs for electronic assemblies for high-speed telecom, datacom networks and high-end computers 2009-2014", Circuit World, Vol. 35 No. 4. https://doi.org/10.1108/cw.2009.21735dab.008

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2009, Emerald Group Publishing Limited


Supply chain opportunities in high-speed electronics a strategic review of PCB, material and interconnection trends and needs for electronic assemblies for high-speed telecom, datacom networks and high-end computers 2009-2014

Article Type: Industry news From: Circuit World, Volume 35, Issue 4

In 2009, the demand for greater bandwidth for video streaming, mobile TV and internet has driven the development of long term evolution, high speed packet access and WiMAX which are designed for data rates of 10 Mbps and beyond and are collectively known as fourth generation (4G). A 3G Basestation has a bandwidth capacity of 10 Mbps. 4G networks will enable a bandwidth capacity of up to 2 Gbps. For continuity and compatibility wireless base stations and remote radio heads must accommodate multiple standards and be easily upgradeable. 10G Ethernet has matured, 40G is emerging and 100G is very much on developers' roadmaps. The current key issue is whether 100G Ethernet will replace OC-768 in the long haul market. Whether 40G or 100G is used, advanced signal modulation and compensation technologies will need to be implemented in transceiver components. At a semiconductor level, digital technology has severe impact on the design for digital data transfer using for instance Ethernet. There is a significant impact for instance on silicon design and cost when we get above 800 Mbps. Systems that are moving to 100G may demand higher performance than those components operating in systems below 25G, the focus of the previous report.

The 2009 High Speed Report will take a look at these and other high speed technologies from 1G to 100G and explore the implications for IC packaging and interconnection technologies, markets and the supply chain. This report builds on the report successfully completed for the IPC membership in 2006 and amongst other items evaluates the following:

  • Embedded optical technologies and optical transceivers.

  • Next generation of routers, servers and basestations (how have requirements changed since 2006, e.g. multicore processors, extra memory and the system architecture for blade servers are having a severe impact on thermal management issues and hence the materials and components that will be demanded.

  • Re-alignments of players, e.g. Nortel, Nokia-Siemens, Alcatel-Lucent mergers and their impact on system design. New Consortiums and standards. What are the implications and opportunities for the supply chain.

  • Full materials update, e.g. Megtron 4 as low cost alternative to Megtron 6, Isola 680, etc.

For further information, please visit the web site: www.bpaconsulting.com

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