Chairman of the Northern Ireland Aerospace Consortium

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology

ISSN: 0002-2667

Article publication date: 1 April 2000

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Citation

(2000), "Chairman of the Northern Ireland Aerospace Consortium", Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Vol. 72 No. 2. https://doi.org/10.1108/aeat.2000.12772bab.060

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2000, MCB UP Limited


Chairman of the Northern Ireland Aerospace Consortium

Chairman of the Northern Ireland Aerospace Consortium

Keywords: Northern Ireland Aerospace Consortium

The Northern Ireland Aerospace Consortium (NIAC) has named Dr Paul Madden of TRW Aeronautical Systems Group (Lucas Aerospace) (NYSE: TRW) its Chairman.

Dr Madden holds the post until September 2000. As Chairman, Dr Madden's role is to ensure that the Consortium meets its primary goal of fostering mutual cooperation among its members in order to grow the aerospace industry in Northern Ireland. The NIAC seeks to achieve this objective via growth of the member companies and investment in the Northern Ireland aerospace industry as a whole.

The NIAC is one of five UK regional aerospace organisations cooperating as part of the UK Aerospace Forum. Dr Madden said:

During its first year, the Consortium established a very strong foundation and I feel honoured that the Governing Council has put its trust in me and TRW to build on that foundation. Already, we have appointed our first marketing executive, are involved in trade missions to The Netherlands and France, and all of the members will be exhibiting at Farnborough International 2000 on the NIAC stand. All in all, it will be a very exciting year.

Established in 1998, the Consortium, whose members employ some 94 per cent of the Province's aerospace employment, includes companies such as TRW Aeronautical Systems, Bombardier Aerospace, Shorts Missile Systems, among others.

Dr Madden is Engineering Centre Manager for TRW Aeronautical Systems' new software engineering facility established in Belfast in December 1998. The Centre develops safety-critical software for electronic control systems for aircraft engines.