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Self-management of dementia by family carers: a hybrid concept analysis

Anas Shehadeh (School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia)
Sharyn Hunter (School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia)
Sarah Jeong (School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia)

Working with Older People

ISSN: 1366-3666

Article publication date: 19 February 2024

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to describe the current conceptualisation of self-management of dementia by family carers in the literature and from the views of dementia professionals and family carers, and to establish a more comprehensive concept of self-management of dementia by family carers.

Design/methodology/approach

A hybrid concept analysis included three phases: the theoretical phase reviewed the literature on self-management of dementia by family carers; the fieldwork phase interviewed professionals and family carers; and the analytical phase synthesised and discussed the findings from the previous two phases.

Findings

The findings revealed that self-management of dementia by family carers encompasses four domains: supporting care recipients, self-care, sustaining a positive relationship with care recipients, and personal characteristics and skills.

Originality/value

The findings highlighted the essential elements of the construct of self-management of dementia by family carers. The findings can be used as a conceptual framework of self-management and are useful in designing and evaluating self-management support interventions for family carers.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Funding: This study was funded by The University of Newcastle. The study sponsor had no role in the design, methods, subject recruitment, data collections, analysis and preparation of paper.

Availability of data and materials: The data sets generated during and/or analysed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

Competing interests: All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval was obtained by The University of Newcastle Institutional Review Board, which deemed this study to be as low risk. All methods were carried out in accordance with relevant guidelines and regulations. Informed consents were obtained where relevant.

The authors would like to thank the funding body (The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia).

Citation

Shehadeh, A., Hunter, S. and Jeong, S. (2024), "Self-management of dementia by family carers: a hybrid concept analysis", Working with Older People, Vol. ahead-of-print No. ahead-of-print. https://doi.org/10.1108/WWOP-10-2023-0041

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2024, Emerald Publishing Limited

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