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Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation: written by Duncan Tonatiuh

Elizabeth Sturm (Department of Special Education, Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois, USA)

Social Studies Research and Practice

ISSN: 1933-5415

Article publication date: 23 May 2017

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation, by Duncan Tonatiuh, along with other materials on school segregation to address the question, is separate ever equal?

Design/methodology/approach

Students compare and contrast segregated schooling using a Venn diagram, then research other instances of school segregation, paying attention to the time periods, geographic locations, and impact on segregated individuals. In pairs, students identify these locations on a US map and create a class timeline of the instances of segregation they uncover. Using their research, the class then discusses segregation and its impact on the segregated groups and individuals. Afterwards, students compare their school to the schools researched to determine if segregation exists in their school, and form a class position statement on the importance and benefits of school desegregation.

Findings

Students will build an understanding of the importance and benefits of school desegregation and the negative impact of segregation.

Originality/value

This lesson plan brings together multiple texts that illustrate the impact of segregation on various cultures in America.

Keywords

Citation

Sturm, E. (2017), "Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation: written by Duncan Tonatiuh", Social Studies Research and Practice, Vol. 12 No. 1, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1108/SSRP-03-2017-0010

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017, Emerald Publishing Limited