A Scottish Consortium of Higher and Further Education Institutions: Developing Collaboration through Critical Incidents

University Partnerships for Pre-Service and Teacher Development

ISBN: 978-1-78714-265-7, eISBN: 978-1-78714-264-0

ISSN: 2055-3641

Publication date: 27 May 2017

Abstract

In the United Kingdom, partnership is increasingly a requirement of public sector funding. Such partnerships, formed strategically to win government contracts, can prove brittle; collaboration is often superficial. This chapter explores how a consortium of Scottish higher, further and adult education institutions, assembled expediently to respond to a contract arising from a Scottish Government strategy for adult literacies, nevertheless became genuinely collaborative. In the course of a six-year project to develop new professional qualifications for adult literacies tutors, a core group within the consortium developed a resilient affiliation able to lever advantage within individual institutions from its association. Its intentionality and readiness to transgress boundaries in the face of institutional obstacles were grounded in a shared pedagogical perspective. We examine how common understandings and shared objectives were forged in a series of critical incidents. The territorialism that often inhibits genuine collaboration was weakened in the face of the allegiances precipitated by these incidents. The virtual learning environment, as a shared boundary object, facilitated the negotiation of interinstitutional collaboration. We conclude that critical incidents and boundary objects can be planned into partnership working to build trust through exposure to risk and vulnerability.

Keywords

Citation

Ackland, A., Roberts, G., Swinney, A. and Wallace, D. (2017), "A Scottish Consortium of Higher and Further Education Institutions: Developing Collaboration through Critical Incidents", University Partnerships for Pre-Service and Teacher Development (Innovations in Higher Education Teaching and Learning, Vol. 10), Emerald Publishing Limited, pp. 17-32. https://doi.org/10.1108/S2055-364120170000010002

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Emerald Publishing Limited

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