Index

Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges

ISBN: 978-1-83982-075-5, eISBN: 978-1-83982-074-8

ISSN: 2040-7246

Publication date: 15 February 2021

This content is currently only available as a PDF

Citation

(2021), "Index", Jones, P., Apostolopoulos, N., Kakouris, A., Moon, C., Ratten, V. and Walmsley, A. (Ed.) Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges (Contemporary Issues in Entrepreneurship Research, Vol. 11), Emerald Publishing Limited, Leeds, pp. 269-276. https://doi.org/10.1108/S2040-724620210000011017

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021 Emerald Publishing Limited


INDEX

Index

Academic(s)
, 14

capitalism
, 200

entrepreneurship
, 57–58

inbreeding
, 43

skills
, 222

Actor-Network Theory (ANT)
, 171

Affective Learner Architecture
, 189–191, 194

Agreeableness
, 25

Alumni clubs
, 55

data analysis
, 53–55

discussion
, 55–56

research design
, 52–53

support members
, 50

universities
, 61–63

Alumni engagement
, 50

Alumni organisations
, 51–52, 56

services to and from alumni
, 53–55

American Marketing Association (AMA)
, 70

Andragogical theory
, 261–262

Antecedents, entrepreneurial intention and
, 124–125

Attitudes
, 119

Auditorium survey methodology
, 262

Average variance extracted (AVE)
, 106

Bacillus thuringiensis (BT)
, 202

Behavioural intention
, 39

Big 5 personality traits
, 25

Business

arena
, 66

field of study and entrepreneurship intention
, 126

schools
, 155

and support services provider
, 141

Business Team Project Partnership Programme (BT-PPP)
, 100

Candidate threshold concepts (CTCs)
, 226–227

in entrepreneurship
, 229

Capability of agency
, 84–85, 91

Career support to professional development
, 54

Centurion University of Technology and Management (CUTM)
, 200

case study approach
, 205–207

collaboration disciplines
, 203–204

collaboration initiatives
, 201–203

context
, 200–201

discussion
, 211–213

government support
, 209–211

human capital
, 208

industry partners
, 209, 211

social orientation
, 207–208

social ventures and subsidiaries
, 209–210

target constituencies
, 208–209

theoretical background
, 201

triple helix conceptual framework
, 204–205

CFI index
, 142

Challenge-based Learning methodology (CBL methodology)
, 186, 193

Challenges
, 186–187, 191, 193–194

Closing theory-practice gap
, 231

Coefficient of determination
, 109

Collaboration

disciplines of CUTM
, 203–204

initiatives of CUTM
, 201–203

Collinearity issue
, 109

Communications landscape
, 66

Complexity
, 168

Conducive educational experience design
, 191–193

Conscientiousness
, 25

Content

marketing
, 70–71

validity
, 107–108

‘Context Is Opportunity’
, 229

‘Context Is Resource’
, 229

Convergent validity
, 108

Coronavirus pandemic
, 73

Correlation
, 108, 109

Covid-19
, 3, 73

Critical thinking
, 105, 110–112

Cross-disciplinary boundaries
, 2

Cultural norms
, 137, 139–140

entrepreneurial education, vs.
, 136

Curriculum content (CC)
, 99–100, 106, 109–110

Customer involvement
, 70

Data analysis
, 123–124, 156

Data collection
, 106–107, 123, 155

De facto agents
, 200

Delphi survey
, 226–227

Descriptive analysis of family background influence
, 127

Dewey’s theory
, 186

Digital age
, 70

Digital marketing (DM)
, 66

digital skills and entrepreneurship education
, 72–73

entrepreneurship and digital marketing
, 69–71

essential competencies for entrepreneurs
, 67–69

Digital skills
, 72–73

Digital software products
, 186–187

Discourse
, 225

E-mail marketing
, 70–71

Economist Intelligence Unit
, 221

Education(al)
, 20, 118

curriculum
, 191–192

and entrepreneurial intention
, 119–120

entrepreneurship programmes
, 99

institutions
, 72

storytelling and emergent narratives in
, 187–188

Educator’s competence (EC)
, 99, 111–112

Educators
, 56

perspective on effective ways of educating in entrepreneurship
, 230

Emergent Narrative System
, 187, 189, 192, 194–195

affective learner architecture
, 189–191

conducive educational experience design
, 191–193

in education
, 187–188

exemplary implementation
, 193–194

Emotional intelligence
, 14–15, 20, 22–23, 25

Empirical t-statistics
, 110

Empirical t-value
, 110

Engagement, framework for
, 230

Entrepreneur
, 141

alternative depictions of
, 241–242

essential competencies for
, 67–69

orthodox depiction of ‘hero’
, 239–240

personality
, 257

sample of student entrepreneurs
, 240–241, 242–245

beyond stereotyped
, 245–247

Entrepreneurial
, 20

activities
, 44

agency
, 229

attributes
, 118

behaviour
, 118

career choice 25

characteristics
, 121

clubs
, 50, 56

competencies
, 67, 255–258

culture
, 137–138, 144

experience
, 85–86

learning
, 52, 58

orientation effect in entrepreneurial intention
, 157

self-efficacy
, 20

skills
, 186

transformation of universities
, 2

university
, 51, 83

Entrepreneurial digital competencies (EDCs)
, 67, 69

Entrepreneurial education
, 26, 34, 44, 97–98, 136–137, 138–139

conceptualisation
, 99–105

cultural norms vs.
, 136–137, 139–140

data collection
, 140

descriptive statistics
, 37

discussion
, 38–39, 110–112, 144–145

empirical results
, 107–108

evolution
, 42–43

impacts of entrepreneurial environment and education
, 43–45

influencing environmental factors
, 44

limitations and future research
, 145–146

measurement
, 142

method
, 142

in Nigerian tertiary institution
, 98

prediction quality of model
, 108–110

programmes
, 13s6

research design
, 105–106

results
, 142–144

in Russian higher education
, 35–37

sample and data collection method
, 106

sample characteristics
, 141–142

sample composition
, 141

social norms
, 137, 139–140

Spearman’s correlation matrix
, 37

statistical analysis and findings
, 37–38

studies about
, 137

variables for emergence
, 36

Entrepreneurial Framework Conditions (EFCs)
, 137, 142

Entrepreneurial identity
, 238–239

alternative depictions of entrepreneur
, 241–242

implications of study
, 247–248

limitations of study
, 248

orthodox depiction of ‘hero’ entrepreneur
, 239–240

sample of student entrepreneurs
, 240–241, 242–245

beyond stereotyped entrepreneur
, 245–247

Entrepreneurial intention
, 20, 91, 118, 152–153

and antecedents
, 124–125

based on different educational programmes
, 125

and behaviour
, 14, 23–25

business field of study and
, 126

correlation matrix
, 41

by different educational programmes
, 120–121

education and
, 119–120

entrepreneurial orientation effect in
, 157

entrepreneurship course and
, 127–128

towards gender
, 126

hierarchical linear regression
, 42

methodology based on TPB
, 40

of Russian, higher education students
, 39–40

statistical analysis and results
, 40–42

students’ background and
, 126–127

Entrepreneurialism
, 20

Entrepreneurship
, 2–3, 14–16, 20, 34, 82, 136, 221–222, 254

basic training
, 100

challenges
, 3–4

curriculum
, 99–101

and digital marketing
, 69–71

education
, 3, 71–73, 120–121, 220–223, 254–255

educator
, 101–102, 230

environment
, 92

formal education in
, 85

intention model
, 87

literature
, 86

process perspective
, 4–5

programmes
, 84, 248

promise of threshold concepts in
, 224

promotion
, 81–82

in Russia
, 34

society’s awareness of
, 45

Entrepreneurship Competence Framework
, 258

Entrepreneurship course

attending effect
, 121

and entrepreneurship intention
, 127–128

influence
, 125–126

‘Entrepreneurship Is a Practice’
, 230

Entrepreneurship research
, 238

article selection process
, 16–18

authors actively involved in publishing
, 20

classification framework for analysis
, 17–18

frequency of keywords
, 20–21

literature reviews
, 16, 17

number of articles per journal
, 19–20

number of articles per method
, 21

number of papers per year
, 18–19

Entrepreneurship training
, 82, 86

correlation matrix
, 90–92

methodology
, 87–90

scale design
, 89

T-student’s test
, 91

Entrepreneurship-fostering environments
, 145

Environmental crisis
, 168

Ethical positioning of university
, 169–170

Exemplary implementation
, 193–194

Experience design, conducive educational
, 191–193

Experience-based measures
, 257

Exploratory factor analysis (EFA)
, 89–90

Extraversion
, 25

Failure as valuable learning experience
, 231

Family background

attitude to start business based on gender and
, 121–122

descriptive analysis of family background influence
, 127

Family support
, 45

Fear of uncertainty
, 225

Flexibility
, 22

Gender
, 20

entrepreneurial intention towards
, 126

stereotypes
, 122

Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM)
, 137, 140

Government support of CUTM
, 209–211

Hard skills
, 35–36

Health Sciences
, 82

Higher education institutions (HEIs)
, 50, 56–57, 82, 87, 169–170

profile of participant HEI
, 88

Himalaya Drug Company
, 209

Human capital
, 257

of CUTM
, 208

Humanities and Behavioural Sciences
, 82

Independence
, 22

Industry and government (IG)
, 200, 202–203, 217–218

Industry partners of CUTM
, 209, 211

Information and communication technologies (ICT)
, 69

Information Technology (IT)
, 15

Innovation
, 104, 173

Innovative companies
, 68

Intention
, 23

Interpersonal relations
, 22

Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA)
, 239

Intolerance of ambiguity
, 225

Kargil
, 206

Knowledge production
, 169, 172–173, 176

Knowledge transfer
, 170, 177

Latin American countries
, 155

social ventures in Latin American economies
, 152

Learning environment
, 102–103, 112

Learning Experience Design Model
, 194

Learning Experience Designer engine
, 191, 193

Legitimacy for entrepreneurship
, 231

Lifelong learning
, 260

Mann-Whitney test
, 126–127

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)
, 73

Masters Entrepreneurship Management Course
, 101

Mexico
, 82–83, 92

Middle Ages
, 168

Modern university
, 200

Narrative progression
, 189

Narrative theory
, 194

National Expert Survey (NES)
, 137, 140, 142

National Skill Development Agency (NSDA)
, 209, 213

Networks/networking
, 120, 221

Neuroticism
, 25

Nigeria
, 97–99

challenges facing entrepreneurship development
, 102, 112

Odisha Milk Marketing Federation
, 210

Online advertising
, 70

Open innovation
, 70

Openness to experience
, 25

Operational model definition
, 105–106

Opportunities

identification
, 104

for real-life learning
, 230

for reflection
, 230

Optimism
, 23

Ordinal logistics regression
, 124, 127

Ortony, Clore, and Collins model (OCC model)
, 190–191

P-values
, 110

Partial least squares (PLS)
, 156

Partial least squares approach to structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM)
, 106–107

Path coefficient model
, 110–111

Peer support
, 45

Perceived behavioural control
, 41

Personal attitude
, 23–24

Personal entrepreneurial competencies (PECs)
, 69

Personality
, 20

traits
, 20

Policy-makers
, 56, 141

Polish universities
, 255

developed during studies in individual university courses
, 263

entrepreneurial competencies
, 255–258

results and discussion
, 262

teaching entrepreneurship
, 258–261

teaching methods
, 264–265

Positive emotions
, 14

Prediction quality of model
, 108–110

Primary and secondary school levels entrepreneurship
, 137–138, 143

Private companies
, 172

Problem solving
, 22

Public research organisations (PRO)
, 172

R-squared
, 41

Relational relevance of University
, 175–177

‘Risk is Missed Opportunity’
, 229

RMSEA index
, 142

Russia’s entrepreneurial performance
, 34–35

Sample collection method
, 106

Schumpeterian entrepreneur
, 254

Search engine optimisation (SEO)
, 70–71

Search engine results pages (SERPs)
, 71

Second academic revolution
, 2

Self-confidence
, 14, 22

Self-determination
, 14

Self-efficacy
, 20, 119

Semi-structured Interviews

and Delphi survey with entrepreneurs
, 226–227

with entrepreneurship educators
, 227–229

Seminars and training courses
, 44

Small-and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)
, 38–39, 68

Social

capital
, 120

cognition
, 223

discourses
, 247

entrepreneurial intention
, 155

entrepreneurial orientation
, 156

environment
, 138, 145

expectations on University of Huelva
, 173–175

function of university
, 169–170

innovation
, 200, 203–204, 212

norms
, 137, 139–140

orientation of CUTM
, 207–208

Social pressure
, 40

Social responsibility
, 22

support system
, 44–45

Social media
, 70

revolution
, 66

Social media marketing (SEM)
, 70–71

Social position in contemporary society

towards ‘third mission’ and ethical positioning of university
, 169–170

approaches to guide comprehension on university’s role
, 170–173

Social Sciences and Technology Sciences
, 82

Social ventures

of CUTM
, 209–210

in Latin American economies
, 152

Society
, 168, 176

awareness of entrepreneurship
, 45

Sociodemographic factors
, 153–155

data analysis
, 156

data collection
, 155

demographic, academic, employment and entrepreneurial history information
, 155

entrepreneurial orientation effect in entrepreneurial intention
, 157

measurement of variables
, 155

as moderator variables
, 157–159

social entrepreneurial intention
, 155

social entrepreneurial orientation
, 156

sociodemographic characteristics
, 156

structural equations of variance
, 158–159

structural variance equations
, 157–158, 160

trajectory coefficients
, 160

Soft skills
, 35–36

Spearman’s correlation
, 128

Speed of change
, 168

SPSS
, 142

Stakeholder Theory (ST)
, 172

Storytelling in education
, 187–188

Stress tolerance
, 22–23

Structural equation modeling (SEM)
, 103, 137

Student-paid educational service income and research income
, 43

Students’ background and entrepreneurial intention
, 126–127

Subsidiaries of CUTM
, 209–210

Substantial size
, 226

Superior levels entrepreneurship
, 137–138

Supporting measures
, 50–51

Target constituencies of CUTM
, 208–209

Teaching

entrepreneurship
, 258–261

knowledge content
, 231

methods
, 264–265

Teamwork
, 231

Technical skills (see Hard skills)

Technology-based businesses
, 39

Territorial Innovation Models
, 171

Theory of Entrepreneurial Event (TEE)
, 23–24

Theory of planned behaviour (TPB)
, 20, 39, 84, 119, 153–154

attitude to start business based on gender and family background
, 121–122

business field of study and entrepreneurship intention
, 126

data analysis
, 123–124

data collection
, 123

descriptive analysis of family background influence
, 127

education and entrepreneurial intention
, 119–120

entrepreneurial intention and antecedents
, 124–125

entrepreneurial intention based on different educational programmes
, 125

entrepreneurial intention by different educational programmes
, 120–121

entrepreneurial intention towards gender
, 126

entrepreneurship course and entrepreneurship intention
, 127–128

entrepreneurship course attending effect
, 121

hypothesis
, 122–123

influence of entrepreneurship course
, 125–126

limitations and future research
, 129

methodology based on
, 40

students’ background and entrepreneurial intention
, 126–127

Theory of stakeholders
, 171

‘Third mission’ of university
, 169–170

Threshold concept framework
, 223–224

criticism of
, 224–225

facilitating threshold concept understanding
, 225–226

promise in entrepreneurship
, 224

Triple helix conceptual framework
, 204–205

Two-tailed significance test
, 38

Universities
, 2–3, 83, 145, 152, 168–169, 238

alumni clubs
, 61–63

challenges
, 3–4

environment
, 44

learning environment
, 102–103

process perspective
, 4–5

relational relevance of
, 175–177

role as agents of social transformation
, 200

social expectations on University of Huelva
, 173–175

social position in contemporary society
, 169–173

students
, 82–83, 85, 152–156

University, Industry and Government (UIG)
, 201–203, 217–218

University and Government (UG)
, 201–203, 217–218

University and Industry (UI)
, 201–203, 217–218

University of Huelva, social expectations on
, 173–175

University of Naples Federico II (Italy)
, 186

University of Porto (UP)
, 123

University Portucalense (UPT)
, 123

Urban Micro Business Centre (UMBC)
, 205

‘Value Is Determined by the Customer’
, 229–230

Venture intention
, 98–100, 103–104

Vocational professional educational level
, 141

Web design
, 70

Women

facing difficulties in rural areas
, 154

female intention, attitude and perceived behaviour control
, 126

Prelims
Chapter 1: Universities and entrepreneurship: Meeting the educational and social challenges
Part I: University and Entrepreneurship in Modern World
Chapter 2: Entrepreneurial Education and Emotional Intelligence: A State of the Art Review
Chapter 3: Entrepreneurial education in Russian universities: Achievements, reflections and milestones
Chapter 4: The Role of Alumni Clubs in the Universities’ Entrepreneurial Networks: An Inquiry in Italian Universities
Chapter 5: Entrepreneurship Education in an Era of Digital Communications
Part II: University and Entrepreneurial Intention
Chapter 6: Effect of Entrepreneurship Training on Students’ Capability of Agency and Entrepreneurship Intention
Chapter 7: Entrepreneurship Education and Venture Intention
Chapter 8: The Influence of the Field of Study and Entrepreneurship Course in Entrepreneurial Intention Among University Students
Part III: University, Entrepreneurship Education and Social Norms
Chapter 9: The Role of Cultural and Social Norms to Create Entrepreneurship Educational Programmes
Chapter 10: Effect of Sociodemographic Factors in Entrepreneurial Orientation and Entrepreneurial Intention in University Students of Latin American Business Schools
Chapter 11: The Social Role of the University Today: From Institutional Prestige to Ethical Positioning
Part IV: University, Entrepreneurship Education and Learning Process
Chapter 12: An Emergent Narrative System to Design Conducive Educational Experiences
Chapter 13: The Triple Helix: A Case Study of Centurion University of Technology and Management
Chapter 14: What is Distinctive about Thinking Like an Entrepreneur and How Can We Educate Students to Do it?
Chapter 15: Entrepreneurship Education and Entrepreneurial Identity: Beyond Stereotypes
Chapter 16: How Polish Universities Develop Students’ Entrepreneurial Competencies?
Index