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Gender Self-Categorization, Emotions, and Experience of Aggression in a Male-Dominated Workforce

Emotions and Identity

ISBN: 978-1-78714-438-5, eISBN: 978-1-78714-437-8

ISSN: 1746-9791

Publication date: 13 July 2017

Abstract

Based on a model of employee personal gender self-categorization, we examine the relationships between prejudicial attitudes and experiences of aggression in a male-dominated workplace. Data collected from 603 employees in a male-dominated global workplace revealed that individuals who self-categorize as either males or females experience differential powerful emotions. Additionally, we found that the more anger experienced by employees who self-categorize either as males or females, the stronger their female prejudicial attitudes. In contrast, we found that contempt was negatively associated with female prejudicial attitudes; that is, the more contempt experienced by employees who self-categorize either as males or females, the weaker their female prejudicial attitudes.

Keywords

Citation

Melgoza, A.R., Ashkanasy, N.M. and Ayoko, O.B. (2017), "Gender Self-Categorization, Emotions, and Experience of Aggression in a Male-Dominated Workforce", Emotions and Identity (Research on Emotion in Organizations, Vol. 13), Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 175-195. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1746-979120170000013010

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017 Emerald Publishing Limited