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Economically, Culturally and Politically Disadvantaged: Perspectives on, and Experiences of, Social Justice amongst Working-class Youth in Mainland Scotland’s Smallest Council Area through the Lens of Nancy Fraser

Human Rights for Children and Youth

ISBN: 978-1-78973-048-7, eISBN: 978-1-78973-047-0

ISSN: 1537-4661

Publication date: 7 October 2019

Abstract

Young people are widely known to have poorer outcomes, social status and political representation than older adults. These disadvantages, which have come to be largely normalized in the contemporary context, can be further compounded by other factors, however, and are particularly amplified by coming from a lower social class background. An additional challenge for young people is associated with place, with youth who live in more remote and less urban areas at a higher risk of being socially excluded (Alston & Kent, 2009; Shucksmith, 2004) and/or to face complex and multiple barriers to employment and education than their urban-dwelling peers (Cartmel & Furlong, 2000). Drawing upon interviews and focus groups in a qualitative project with 16 young people and five practitioners, and using Nancy Fraser’s tripartite theory of social justice, this paper highlights the various and interlocking disadvantages experienced by working-class young people moving into and through adulthood in Clackmannanshire, mainland Scotland’s smallest council area.

Keywords

Citation

McPherson, C. (2019), "Economically, Culturally and Politically Disadvantaged: Perspectives on, and Experiences of, Social Justice amongst Working-class Youth in Mainland Scotland’s Smallest Council Area through the Lens of Nancy Fraser", Human Rights for Children and Youth (Sociological Studies of Children and Youth, Vol. 24), Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 193-220. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1537-466120190000024011

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

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