The Impact of Digital Communication Technologies and New Remote-Working Cultures on the Socialization and Work-Readiness of Individuals in WIL Programs

Work-Integrated Learning in the 21st Century

ISBN: 978-1-78714-860-4, eISBN: 978-1-78714-859-8

ISSN: 1479-3679

Publication date: 29 August 2017

Abstract

Social media, network capabilities, and digital communication technologies are changing the nature of work for individuals in WIL programs; further challenging the connections between industries and universities in their efforts to ensure individuals are work ready. However, digital technologies have provided new resources to help individuals socialize into the workplace and develop new skills for meeting the challenges of the information age that will also impact on how they get a job, and then do that job. The current literature on WIL, organizational behavior, and remote working, provides a theoretical framework for identifying the key points on the transitions experienced by individuals through WIL using the prism of social media, digital technologies, and the changes in work culture through remote working. Key issues in relation to transition are illustrated using two examples: one French and the other Canadian. The French study examines the effects of social media and digital technologies on individuals in WIL programs in relation to developing work readiness skills and communicating with supervisors and coworkers. The Canadian example examines the challenges internship students face when their workplace is predicated on remote working. The impact of social media, digital and communication technologies present new challenges for fulfilling the objectives of WIL programs and ensuring students are ready for work now and in the future.

Keywords

Citation

Bowen, T. and Pennaforte, A. (2017), "The Impact of Digital Communication Technologies and New Remote-Working Cultures on the Socialization and Work-Readiness of Individuals in WIL Programs", Work-Integrated Learning in the 21st Century (International Perspectives on Education and Society, Vol. 32), Emerald Publishing Limited, pp. 99-112. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1479-367920170000032006

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017 Emerald Publishing Limited

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