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Adjunct Faculty Professional Identity: An African-American Postsecondary Administrator's Part-time Teaching Narrative

The Beauty and the Burden of Being a Black Professor

ISBN: 978-1-83867-268-3, eISBN: 978-1-83867-267-6

ISSN: 1479-3644

Publication date: 18 January 2021

Abstract

The underrepresentation of African-American faculty in the US professoriate has persisted for some time. Relatedly, adjunct faculty remain a fast-growing sector of the professoriate. Adjunct faculty include “experts” and “specialists” who teach postsecondary courses with a narrow focus and with content tailored to their full-time employment. Using a qualitative narrative approach, I delineate ways I construct meaning for myself as a part-timer. I develop a cultural interpretation of adjunct teaching that provides alternative view of professional socialization to counter the ongoing challenge of increasing the number of Black faculty in higher education. In doing so, three themes from the data (ideal worker as adjunct, historical role models, and clinical value of course content) suggest the identity of part-time faculty is situated in personal, professional, and cultural experiences.

Citation

Campbell, C.D. (2021), "Adjunct Faculty Professional Identity: An African-American Postsecondary Administrator's Part-time Teaching Narrative", Davis, C.H., Hilton, A., Hamrick, R. and Brooks, F.E. (Ed.) The Beauty and the Burden of Being a Black Professor (Diversity in Higher Education, Vol. 24), Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 111-126. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1479-364420210000024011

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

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