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Chapter 14 Asian American Women Faculty and the Contested Space of the Classroom: Navigating Student Resistance and (Re)Claiming Authority and their Rightful Place

Women of Color in Higher Education: Turbulent Past, Promising Future

ISBN: 978-1-78052-180-0, eISBN: 978-1-78052-169-5

ISSN: 1479-3644

Publication date: 18 August 2011

Abstract

The study is based on a secondary data analysis of qualitative studies on Asian American women's classroom experiences in predominantly White institutions. It finds that students of all racial/ethnic and gender backgrounds may resist their faculty role, oftentimes through uncivil behaviors. Students hold racial, gender, and ethnocentric stereotypes and biases of their teaching capabilities and course offerings. Teaching race–gender–class–nation courses can contribute to lower or mixed course evaluations. In claiming their rightful place, Asian American women faculty seek to make a difference through student-centered learning, innovative pedagogy, and new curricula that prepare students for a diverse and global society. They demonstrate their authenticity, authority, and agency in the ways they navigate challenging classroom situations and serve as role models for all students and faculty.

Citation

Hune, S. (2011), "Chapter 14 Asian American Women Faculty and the Contested Space of the Classroom: Navigating Student Resistance and (Re)Claiming Authority and their Rightful Place", Jean-Marie, G. and Lloyd-Jones, B. (Ed.) Women of Color in Higher Education: Turbulent Past, Promising Future (Diversity in Higher Education, Vol. 9), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 307-335. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1479-3644(2011)0000009019

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited