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Stress, Psychological Strain, and Reduced Organizational Effectiveness: The Destructive Consequences of the Use of Intimidation and Pressure by Supervisors

Power, Politics, and Political Skill in Job Stress

ISBN: 978-1-78743-066-2, eISBN: 978-1-78743-065-5

ISSN: 1479-3555

Publication date: 14 August 2017

Abstract

This chapter builds on previous research that conceptualized organizational politics as an organizational stressor. After reviewing the studies that integrated the occupational stress literature with the organizational politics literature, it discusses the negative implications of the use of intimidation and pressure by supervisors, implications that have generally been overlooked. Specifically, the chapter presents a conceptual model positing that the use of intimidation and pressure by supervisors creates stress in their subordinates. This stress, in turn, affects subordinates’ well-being, evident in higher levels of job dissatisfaction, job burnout, and turnover intentions. The stress also reduces the effectiveness of the organization, reflected in a high absenteeism rate, poorer task performance, and a decline in organizational citizenship behavior. The model also maintains that individual differences in emotional intelligence and political skill mitigate the stress experienced by subordinates, resulting from the use of intimidation and pressure by their supervisors. In acknowledging the destructive implications of such behavior in terms of employees’ well-being and the productivity of the organization, the chapter raises doubts about the wisdom of using it, and advises supervisors to rethink its use as a motivational tool. Implications of this chapter, as well as future research directions, are discussed.

Keywords

Citation

Meisler, G., Vigoda-Gadot, E. and Drory, A. (2017), "Stress, Psychological Strain, and Reduced Organizational Effectiveness: The Destructive Consequences of the Use of Intimidation and Pressure by Supervisors", Power, Politics, and Political Skill in Job Stress (Research in Occupational Stress and Well Being, Vol. 15), Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 51-80. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1479-355520170000015005

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017 Emerald Publishing Limited