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Information and communication technology: Implications for job stress and employee well-being

New Developments in Theoretical and Conceptual Approaches to Job Stress

ISBN: 978-1-84950-712-7, eISBN: 978-1-84950-713-4

ISSN: 1479-3555

Publication date: 17 March 2010

Abstract

In this chapter, we use the job demands–resources (JD-R) model (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2001) and the transactional model of stress (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984) to provide a theoretical framework with which to examine information and communication technology (ICT) as both a demand and a resource. We review specific characteristics of ICT that may either increase or decrease employee stress and well-being. Specifically, we examine the extent that ICT increases accessibility of workers and access to information, the extent to which it improves communication and control over one's job and life, and the extent to which it is used to monitor employees or provide feedback. Finally, we examine the organizational, job, and individual factors that may mitigate or exacerbate the impact of ICT demands on individual outcomes.

Citation

Day, A., Scott, N. and Kevin Kelloway, E. (2010), "Information and communication technology: Implications for job stress and employee well-being", Perrewé, P.L. and Ganster, D.C. (Ed.) New Developments in Theoretical and Conceptual Approaches to Job Stress (Research in Occupational Stress and Well Being, Vol. 8), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 317-350. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1479-3555(2010)0000008011

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2010, Emerald Group Publishing Limited