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Karasek's (1979) job demands-control model: A summary of current issues and recommendations for future research

New Developments in Theoretical and Conceptual Approaches to Job Stress

ISBN: 978-1-84950-712-7, eISBN: 978-1-84950-713-4

ISSN: 1479-3555

Publication date: 17 March 2010

Abstract

Karasek's (1979) job demands-control model is one of the most widely studied models of occupational stress (de Lange, Taris, Kompier, Houtman, & Bongers, 2003). The key idea behind the job demands-control model is that control buffers the impact of job demands on strain and can help enhance employees’ job satisfaction with the opportunity to engage in challenging tasks and learn new skills (Karasek, 1979). Most research on the job demands-control has been inconsistent (de Lange et al., 2003; Van Der Deof & Maes, 1999), and the main reasons cited for this inconsistency are that different variables have been used to measure demands, control, and strain, not enough longitudinal research has been done, and the model does not take workers’ individual characteristics into account (Van Der Deof & Maes, 1999). To address these concerns, expansions have been made on the model such as integrating resources, self-efficacy, active coping, and social support into the model (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2001b; Johnson & Hall, 1988; Demerouti, Bakker, de Jonge, Janssen, & Schaufeli, 2001a; Landsbergis, Schnall, Deitz, Friedman, & Pickering, 1992). However, researchers have only been partially successful, and therefore, to continue reducing inconstencies, we recommend using longitudinal designs, both objective and subjective measures, a higher sample size, and a careful consideration of the types of demands and control that best match each other theoretically.

Citation

Kain, J. and Jex, S. (2010), "Karasek's (1979) job demands-control model: A summary of current issues and recommendations for future research", Perrewé, P.L. and Ganster, D.C. (Ed.) New Developments in Theoretical and Conceptual Approaches to Job Stress (Research in Occupational Stress and Well Being, Vol. 8), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 237-268. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1479-3555(2010)0000008009

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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