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Twice-Told Tales? How Public Inquiry Could Inform n of 1 Case Study Research

Case Study Evaluation: Past, Present and Future Challenges

ISBN: 978-1-78441-064-3, eISBN: 978-1-78441-063-6

ISSN: 1474-7863

Publication date: 3 January 2015

Abstract

The advantages of a public inquiry as a data source for case study research typically include a clear and uncontested focus of inquiry; the breadth and richness of the dataset collected; the exceptional level of support available for the tasks of transcribing, indexing, collating, summarising and so on; and the expert interpretations and insights of the inquiry’s chair (with which the researcher may or may not agree). A significant disadvantage is that whilst the dataset collected for a public inquiry is typically ‘rich’, it has usually been collected under far from ideal research conditions. Hence, while public inquiries provide a potentially rich resource for researchers, those who seek to use public inquiry data for research must justify their choice on both ethical and scientific grounds.

Keywords

Citation

Greenhalgh, T. (2015), "Twice-Told Tales? How Public Inquiry Could Inform n of 1 Case Study Research", Case Study Evaluation: Past, Present and Future Challenges (Advances in Program Evaluation, Vol. 15), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 181-206. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1474-786320140000015007

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2015 Emerald Group Publishing Limited