Prelims

Immigration and Health

ISBN: 978-1-78743-062-4, eISBN: 978-1-78743-061-7

ISSN: 1057-6290

Publication date: 7 January 2019

Citation

(2019), "Prelims", Immigration and Health (Advances in Medical Sociology, Vol. 19), Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. i-xii. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1057-629020190000019015

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2019 Emerald Publishing Limited


Half Title Page

IMMIGRATION AND HEALTH

Series Page

ADVANCES IN MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY

Series Editor: Brea L. Perry

Series Editor for Volumes 7–15: Barbara Katz Rothman

Series Editor for Volumes 5–6: Gary L. Albrecht

Series Editor for Volumes 7–8: Judith A. Levy

Recent Volumes:

Volume 5: Quality of Life in Health Care – Edited by Ray Fitzpatrick
Volume 6: Case and Care Management – Edited by Gary L. Albrecht
Volume 7: Emergent Issues in the Field of Drug Abuse – Edited by Judith A. Levy, Richard C. Stephens and Duane C. McBride
Volume 8: Social Networks and Health – Edited by Bernice A. Pescosolido and Judith A. Levy
Volume 9: Bioethical Issues, Sociological Perspectives – Edited by Barbara K. Rothman, Elizabeth M. Armstrong and Rebecca Tiger
Volume 10: Patients, Consumers and Civil Society – Edited by Susan M. Chambré and Melinda Goldner
Volume 11: Understanding Emerging Epidemics: Social and Political Approaches – Edited by Ananya Mukherjea
Volume 12: Sociology of Diagnosis – Edited by PJ McGann and David J. Hutson
Volume 13: Sociological Reflections on the Neurosciences – Edited by Martyn Pickersgill and Ira van Keulen
Volume 14: Critical Perspectives on Addiction – Edited by Julie Netherland
Volume 15: Ecological Health: Society, Ecology and Health – Edited by Maya Gislason
Volume 16: Genetics, Health and Society – Edited by Brea L. Perry
Volume 17: 50 Years After Deinstitutionalization: Mental Illness in Contemporary Communities – Edited by Brea L. Perry
Volume 18: Food Systems and Health – Edited by Sara Shostak

Editorial Board Members

Editorial Board Members (at 21/08/18):

  • Rene Almeling

    Yale University, USA

  • Cynthia Colen

    Ohio State University, USA

  • D. Phuong Do

    University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, USA

  • Andrew Fenelon

    University of Maryland, USA

  • Jennifer Fishman

    McGill University,

  • Jennifer Glick

    Penn State University, USA

  • Erin Hamilton

    UC Davis, USA

  • Rhiannon Kroeger

    Louisiana State University, USA

  • Adam Lippert

    University of Colorado Denver, USA

  • Norah MacKendrick

    Rutgers University, USA

  • Julia McQuillan

    University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA

  • Daniel Menchik

    Michigan State University, USA

  • Ilana Redstone Akresh

    University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, USA

  • Janet Shim

    University of California San Francisco, USA

  • Lindsay Stevens

    Princeton University, USA

Title Page

ADVANCES IN MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY VOLUME 19

IMMIGRATION AND HEALTH

EDITED BY

REANNE FRANK

The Ohio State University, USA

United Kingdom – North America – Japan – India – Malaysia – China

Copyright Page

Emerald Publishing Limited

Howard House, Wagon Lane, Bingley BD16 1WA, UK

First edition 2019

Copyright © 2019 Emerald Publishing Limited

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British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

ISBN: 978-1-78743-062-4 (Print)

ISBN: 978-1-78743-061-7 (Online)

ISBN: 978-1-78743-251-2 (Epub)

ISSN: 1057-6290 (Series)

About the Authors

Victor Agadjanian is a Professor of Sociology at the University of California – Los Angeles. His research has examined migration, sexual and reproductive health, gender, ethnicity, and religion in developing and transitional settings. He has directed large projects in sub-Saharan Africa and Central Eurasia and has published in several languages in leading international outlets.

Erick Axxe is a Graduate Student in Sociology at the Ohio State University and a Student Affiliate of the Institute for Population Research. His research focuses on immigrant identity and integration. In particular, his work focuses on the structures which influence social trust in communities.

Coralia Balasca is a Doctoral Student in the Department of Sociology at the Ohio State University and an Affiliate of the Institute for Population Research (IPR). Her research focuses on the intersection of health and migration with a focus on health disparities in contemporary national and international contexts.

Shawn Bauldry is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Purdue University. His research has explored the interrelationships between socioeconomic resources and health over the life course and across generations. His work has been published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Social Science & Medicine, and other scholarly journals.

Chih-Chien Huang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Saint Anselm College. Her current research projects focus on health perceptions among Asian Americans. Professor Huang’s areas of expertise include socioeconomic determinants and gender disparities in the prevalence of Chinese obesity, Asian American body weight disparities, and the role of health behaviors in contributing to obesity.

Deisy Del Real is a PhD Candidate in Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research seeks to understand the negative consequences of immigration enforcement and to identify policy solutions from other parts of the world that can help us create more humane immigration laws.

Nathan T. Dollar is a Graduate Student in Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Pre-doctoral Trainee at the Carolina Population Center. His research focuses on international migration and the effect of labor market segmentation on the health and mortality of migrant populations in the United States. His work also examines how geographic variations in political and economic context shape population health outcomes.

Michal Engelman is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Faculty Research Associate at the Center for Demography and Ecology and the Center for Demography of Health and Aging. Her research examines the patterns of health throughout the life course and connections between social disadvantage and disparities in health.

Brian Karl Finch, PhD, is a Research Professor of Sociology & Spatial Sciences, Director of the Southern California Population Research Center, and Senior Social Demographer at the Center for Economic and Social Research at the University of Southern California.

Reanne Frank is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the Ohio State University and faculty affiliate of the Institute for Population Research (IPR). Her active research agenda centers on the sociology of immigration and race/ethnic inequality with a focus on demographic and health outcomes.

Michelle L. Frisco is Associate Professor of Sociology and Demography at Penn State University. Her research is aimed at better understanding the intersection of young people’s family lives, school experiences and health and well-being and how racial/ethnic and nativity health inequalities emerge over time.

Erin Ice is a Doctoral Student at the University of Michigan in the Department of Sociology and Pre-Doctoral Trainee at the Population Studies Center. Her research focuses on health sector correlates of health and aging disparities, currently analyzing how changes in insurance billing practices have influenced invasive preventative technology use.

Molly A. Martin is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Demography at Penn State University. Her research seeks to understand how inequalities are produced and reproduced across generations by bridging areas of sociology of families, social stratification, medical sociology, and demography.

Gerardo Maupomé has been a Professor with Indiana University since 2005, more recently in the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health as Associate Dean of Research. His research interests include oral epidemiology, dental health services research, oral health disparities, and analysis of decision-making among dental professionals.

Brea L. Perry is a Professor of Sociology at Indiana University. Her research interests include social networks, medical sociology, and education. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles and has been funded by NIH and NSF. Her book, Egocentric Network Analysis: Foundations, Methods, and Models, was published in 2018.

Erin Pullen is an Assistant Research Scientist at the Indiana University Network Science Institute. Her work investigates how relationships between personal networks, health behaviors, and health outcomes co-evolve over time, especially in the context of disadvantage. In particular, her work focuses on the ways intersectional inequalities shape networks and health.

Annie Ro is an Assistant Professor in the program in Public Health at UC Irvine. She is a health demographer who studies social determinants of immigrant health, focusing on country of origin factors, adaptation processes, and immigrant receiving contexts among adult Latino and Asian immigrants.

Melissa Rodriguez is a Graduate Student of Sociology at the Ohio State University and a Student Affiliate at the Institute for Population Research. Her research focuses on US–Mexico migration and Latinos’ experiences in the United States. Her work also examines race and class variations in educational experiences and trajectories.

Kammi K. Schmeer is an Associate Professor in the Sociology Department at the Ohio State University. Her research focuses on how family contexts affect children’s health and physiological stress in the US and in low-income countries. She is also an Affiliate of the Institute for Population Research at Ohio State.

May Sudhinaraset is an Assistant Professor in Community Health Sciences in the School of Public Health at UCLA. Her research focuses on understanding the social determinants of migrant and women’s health including cultural contexts of vulnerable populations, quality of care globally, and social policies and immigration in the United States.

Magdalena Szaflarski is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Scientist in Medicine and Public Health at the University of Alabama-Birmingham. Her research interests include immigrant mental health, religion and HIV, health-related quality of life, and medical cannabis use. Her research has been funded by NIH, state agencies, and private foundations.

Jacqueline Torres is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics at UCSF. Her research examines the impact of social and policy factors on the health of migrants and their family members.

Jennifer Van Hook is Roy C. Buck Professor of Sociology and Demography at Penn State University and a Non-Resident Fellow at the Migration Policy Institute. Her work focuses on immigrant populations and the socioeconomic integration of immigrants and their children, including the health and well-being of immigrants and their children.

Leafia Zi Ye is a Doctoral Student in Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an Affiliate of the Center for Demography and Ecology. Her primary research interests are immigrant assimilation and social determinants of well-being. She currently has two streams of work: one stream focuses on immigrants’ health and earnings trajectories and the other on family structure and the well-being of children in immigrant families.

Natalia Zotova is a PhD Candidate at the Ohio State University. She is a Cultural Anthropologist who studies migration and health and focuses on migration from Central Asia to the US and Russia. Her work explores the experiences of migrants and the resources and social networks that they use while accommodating to a new setting, as well as their perceptions of stress and insecurity both in the countries of origin and destination. She also researches implications of transnational migration for the physical and psychological well-being of movers and their families.