Prelims

Advances in Group Processes

ISBN: 978-1-80043-233-8, eISBN: 978-1-80043-232-1

ISSN: 0882-6145

Publication date: 20 October 2020

Citation

(2020), "Prelims", Thye, S.R. and Lawler, E.J. (Ed.) Advances in Group Processes (Advances in Group Processes, Vol. 37), Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. i-xii. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0882-614520200000037008

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2020 Emerald Publishing Limited


Half Title Page

Advances in Group Processes

Series Title Page

Advances in Group Processes

Series Coeditors: Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler

Recent volumes

Volumes 1–17: Edited by Edward J. Lawler
Volume 18: Edited by Edward J. Lawler and Shane R. Thye
Volume 19: Group Cohesion, Trust, and Solidarity – Edited by Edward J. Lawler and Shane R. Thye
Volume 20: Power and Status – Edited by Shane R. Thye and John Skvoretz
Volume 21: Theory and Research on Human Emotions – Edited by Jonathan H. Turner
Volume 22: Social Identification in Groups – Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 23: Social Psychology of the Workplace – Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 24: Social Psychology of Gender – Edited by Shelley J. Correll
Volume 25: Justice – Edited by Karen A. Hegtvedt and Jody Clay-Warner
Volume 26: Altruism and Prosocial Behavior in Groups – Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 27: Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 28: Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 29: Edited by Will Kalkhoff, Shane R. Thye, and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 30: Thirtieth Anniversary Edition – Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 31: Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 32: Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 33: Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 34: Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 35: Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler
Volume 36: Edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler

Editorial Advisory Board

Jessica Collett
University of California, Los Angeles, USA
Will Kalkhoff
Kent State University, USA
Joseph Dippong
University of North Carolina, Charlotte, USA
Jeff Lucas
University of Maryland, USA
Ashley Harrell
Duke University, USA
Jennifer McLeer
University of Hartford, USA
Karen Hegtvedt
Emory University, USA
Jane Sell
Texas A&M University, USA

Title Page

Advances In Group Processes Volume 37

Advances in Group Processes

Edited by

Shane R. Thye

University of South Carolina

Edward J. Lawler

Cornell University

United Kingdom – North America – Japan India – Malaysia – China

Copyright Page

Emerald Publishing Limited

Howard House, Wagon Lane, Bingley BD16 1WA, UK

First edition 2020

Copyright © 2020 Emerald Publishing Limited

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British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

ISBN: 978-1-80043-233-8 (Print)

ISBN: 978-1-80043-232-1 (Online)

ISBN: 978-1-80043-234-5 (Epub)

ISSN: 0882-6145 (Series)

List of Contributors

Seth Abrutyn Department of Sociology University of British Columbia, BC, CA
Peter J. Burke Department of Sociology University of California, Riverside, CA, USA
Katie Constantin Department of Sociology Texas A&M, TX, USA
Arwen H. DeCostanza Army Research Lab Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, USA
David Dunning Department of Psychology University of Michigan, MI, USA
Jake Frederick Department of Sociology University of South Carolina, SC, USA
Will Kalkhoff Department of Sociology Kent State University, OH, USA
Omar Lizardo Department of Sociology University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Barry Markovsky Department of Sociology University of South Carolina, SC, USA
Brennan J. Miller Department of Sociology Kent State University, OH, USA
Chantrey J. Murphy Department of Sociology Cal. State University, Long Beach, CA, USA
Jane Sell Department of Sociology Texas A&M, TX, USA
Richard T. Serpe Department of Sociology Kent State University, OH, USA
Joseph Silcox Department of Sociology University of Massachusetts, MA, USA
Jan E. Stets Department of Sociology University of California Riverside, CA, USA
Robin Stryker Department of Sociology Purdue University, IN, USA
Lisa Troyer Army Research Office Research Triangle Park, NC, USA
Kaidi Wu Department of Psychology University of Michigan, MI, USA
Reef Youngreen Department of Sociology University of Massachusetts, MA, USA

Preface

Advances in Group Processes is a peer-reviewed annual volume that publishes theoretical analyses, reviews, and theory-based empirical chapters on group phenomena. The series adopts a broad conception of “group processes.” This includes work on groups ranging from the very small to the very large, and on classic and contemporary topics such as status, power, trust, justice, conflict, social influence, heuristics, identity, decision-making, intergroup relations, and social networks. Previous contributors have included scholars from diverse fields including sociology, psychology, political science, economics, business, philosophy, computer science, mathematics, and organizational behavior.

Several years ago, we added an editorial board to the series to broaden the review process and draw upon the collective expertise of some of the top scholars in the discipline. That board consists of Jessica Collett, Joseph Dippong, Ashley Harrell, Karen Hegtvedt, Will Kalkhoff, Jennifer McLeer, Jeff Lucas, and Jane Sell. This group of scholars has made the series better and we are grateful for their service, guidance, and advice.

The volume opens with two chapters that address how social cognition impacts behavior. The first chapter asks if socially dominant groups are cognitively aware of the privileges they enjoy from group membership. Kaidi Wu and David Dunning review recent empirical work demonstrating and explaining how certain groups (white men) are prone to this phenomenon in “Hypocognition and the Invisibility of Social Privilege.” This work shows that members of socially dominant groups have a harder time generating and remembering examples of discrimination faced by other groups. The chapter is an important conceptual step forward and provides clarification to the extant literature. Next, Lisa Troyer and Arwen H. DeCostanza review a vast amount of military research to understand “Group Dynamics in Disrupted Environments.” This chapter nicely illustrates how the group processes literature informs research on how groups function in disrupted environments. It represents an important bridge between research in the group processes domain and that on military contexts and topics. We are pleased to have both chapters in the series.

The next chapter address issues related to one's reputation. Jane Sell, Katie Constantin, and Chantrey J. Murphy review how the concept of reputation has been used in sociology, organizational behavior, political science, psychology, and economics in “Reputation, Forgiveness, and Solving Problems of Cooperation.” They examine the commonalities and differences across literatures, and then analyze how bad reputations may be repaired. Offered are formal definitions to synthesize these various notions. The chapter adds an original touch and much clarification to the concept of reputation and will be a must read for scholars interested in its effects.

The next is a first of a kind in the Advances series. Reef Youngreen and Joseph Silcox analyze the concept of time in “Where did the Time Go?: Insights on the Meanings and Uses of Time in Sociological Social Psychology.” These authors review research concepts involving time in psychology, sociology, and related fields. They assert that much research has failed to adequately incorporate time as a central concept, and they connect recent thinking about time to contemporary group processes research predominantly in the social identity tradition. The chapter offers a very creative and original look at how the notion of time can be better used, and we are proud to include it in this volume. Next, Seth Abrutyn and Omar Lizardo consider work in affective and cognitive neuroscience to better understand the range of human emotions and the self in “Grief, Care, and Play: Theorizing the Affective Roots of the Social Self.” Using research from contemporary cognitive and neuroscience, they seek to broaden the kinds of emotionally related targets sociologist typically study. This work is anchored in the theory of affective systems, symbolic interactionism, and identity theory and will be an important chapter to those scholars working in those traditions.

The final block of chapters addresses theoretical and empirical issues related to identity theory. Brennan J. Miller and Will Kalkhoff examine the wide-ranging effects of identity nonverification in “Negotiating a Non-Verified Identity: Emotional, Cognitive, and Behavioral Responses.” They present the results from a within-subjects experiment that persistently fails to verify the “student” identity among college student participants. They find that, contrary to predictions from the perceptual control model of identity theory, the effects of nonverification on negative emotion and behavior change is curvilinear, rather than the predicted linear effects. They conclude that too much nonverification produces a sharp rise in negative emotion and rejection of social feedback. This is an important chapter that suggests potential modifications to the modeling of identity nonverification.

Next, Barry Markovsky and Jake Frederick seek to locate the key definitions, assumptions, and semantic structure of Stryker's identity theory in “Identity Theory: Analysis and Reconstruction.” Upon reviewing literature related to identity theory, they purport to find a number of existing gaps in the theory. Importantly, along the way they offer suggestions for improvement. Understanding that this chapter may draw attention and possible criticism from differing points of view, we decided to engage in yet another first for the series; we invited leading identity theorists to preview the chapter and then write a “comment” on it. That comment appears in “Getting Identity Theory (IT) Right” by Jan E. Stets, Peter J. Burke, Richard T. Serpe, and Robin Stryker. Barry Markovsky then replies to this comment in “Where is IT (Identity Theory)?” Our hope is that this vibrant exchange will further shed light on the semantic analysis of and empirical research on identity theory.

Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler

Series and Volume Coeditors