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Orphaned Jazz: Short-Lived Start-ups and the Long-Run Success of Depression-Era Cultural Products

History and Strategy

ISBN: 978-1-78190-024-6, eISBN: 978-1-78190-025-3

ISSN: 0742-3322

Publication date: 21 August 2012

Abstract

Findings/originality/value – I find that while the evolution of tastes has a substantial effect beyond the control of a firm's managers, a start-up's decision-makers were able to positively influence the long-run appeal of music when they (a) recorded tunes with new artists and (b) were able to create an early big hit with the tune. These results demonstrate how and why, even with cultural producers in one of the greatest economic disasters in U.S. history, managerial decisions were meaningful for product performance. Finally, I show that the effect of being a start-up on the long-run appeal of a tune is time-varying such that being a start-up in 1929 or 1933 does not harm a tune's appeal until after World War II. These final analyses point to further ways in which strategy, history, and sociology might combine to further scholarship on the management of organizations.

Keywords

Citation

Phillips, D.J. (2012), "Orphaned Jazz: Short-Lived Start-ups and the Long-Run Success of Depression-Era Cultural Products", Kahl, S.J., Silverman, B.S. and Cusumano, M.A. (Ed.) History and Strategy (Advances in Strategic Management, Vol. 29), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 315-350. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0742-3322(2012)0000029014

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2012, Emerald Group Publishing Limited