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Teachers’ Causal Attributions for Student Problem Behavior: Implications for School-Based Behavioral Interventions and Research

Classroom Behavior, Contexts, and Interventions

ISBN: 978-1-78052-972-1, eISBN: 978-1-78052-973-8

ISSN: 0735-004X

Publication date: 29 August 2012

Abstract

Although we have improved identification of and access to evidence-based interventions for addressing student problem behavior, teacher use of these practices remains low. In this chapter, we examine teachers’ causal attributions for student problem behavior and their implications for use of effective school-based behavioral interventions and supports. Attribution theory and research suggest that causal attributions strongly influence how individuals (e.g., teachers) perceive and respond to the problem behavior of others (e.g., students). Teacher perception regarding problem behavior and appropriate responses to it can be a significant barrier to the adoption and sustained implementation of empirically supported practices. In light of these factors, causal attribution theory and research can be used as a framework for better understanding and even changing teacher beliefs related to acceptance, implementation, and sustained use of effective behavior management practices. In this chapter, we make the case for cultivating an understanding of teachers’ causal attributions of student problem behavior and considering implications of causal attributions in future research. We explore how such research endeavors can potentially positively impact teacher implementation of effective school-based behavioral interventions and supports.

Citation

Wiley, A.L., Tankersley, M. and Simms, A. (2012), "Teachers’ Causal Attributions for Student Problem Behavior: Implications for School-Based Behavioral Interventions and Research", Cook, B.G., Tankersley, M. and Landrum, T.J. (Ed.) Classroom Behavior, Contexts, and Interventions (Advances in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities, Vol. 25), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 279-300. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0735-004X(2012)0000025014

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2012, Emerald Group Publishing Limited