Index

The Contested Moralities of Markets

ISBN: 978-1-78769-120-9, eISBN: 978-1-78769-119-3

ISSN: 0733-558X

Publication date: 2 September 2019

This content is currently only available as a PDF

Citation

(2019), "Index", Schiller-Merkens, S. and Balsiger, P. (Ed.) The Contested Moralities of Markets (Research in the Sociology of Organizations, Vol. 63), Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 211-218. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0733-558X20190000063001

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2019 Emerald Publishing Limited


INDEX

Index

Note: Page numbers followed by “n” with numbers indicate notes.

Active ownership
, 169, 171, 181

Activists as moral entrepreneurs (see also Brands as moral entrepreneurs)

creating free space for mobilization
, 171–173

Ethos
, 169, 171

Ethos’ ability
, 182–183

making inroads among individual firms
, 178–180

mobilizing core allies
, 173–176

mobilizing distant allies
, 176–178

moral behavior
, 168–169

political process model for moralization of economy
, 170

spread moral concern across entire economy
, 180–181

Address economic viability
, 98

Agreed-upon moral standards
, 152

American Journal of Transplantation
, 35–36

Anthropological scholarship
, 71–72

Anthroposophical farms
, 140

Anti-apartheid movement
, 128

Anti-capitalist movements
, 137

Anti-discrimination laws
, 88–89

Anti-economic
, 113

Anti-environmentalist
, 116

Anti-transporters group (GAP)
, 73, 193

Anticorporate activism
, 8

Apfelbäumchen Club
, 158

Argentine
, 74–75

garment industry
, 72

Aspirations and morality in markets for counterfeits

emerging aspirations and moral justifications
, 73–81

morality, contestation, and illegal markets
, 70–72

site and methods
, 72–73

Autorité de regulation des jeux en ligne (ARJEL)
, 40

Bank’s institutionalized criticism
, 131

Banking sector
, 128

Biomarket
, 35–36, 42–43

Biomilcherklärung
, 118

Blame disabled workers
, 94–95

Bonus payments
, 136

Bourdieusian approach
, 119

Bourdieusian field theory
, 112–115

Bourdieusian field theory I depict moralized markets
, 109

Bourgeois charity act
, 93

Brand managers
, 152

Brand publics
, 152

Brands as moral entrepreneurs (see also Activists as moral entrepreneurs)
, 152–153

media recruitment into moral struggles
, 157–162

moral struggle between Waldviertler and FMA
, 155–157

protest mediation
, 154–155

protest rhetoric
, 153–154

protestainment as branding strategy
, 162–164

British Fashion Council (BFC)
, 144

Bureaucratization
, 92

Businesses
, 52

case for social responsibility
, 96

and society scholars
, 7

Caisse de prévoyance de l’Etat de Genève (CPEG)
, 183

Caisse de prévoyance du personnel enseignant de l’instruction publique et des fonctionnaires de l’administration du canton de Genève (CIA)
, 171

Capital stocks
, 118

Carbon

neutral
, 51

neutrality
, 53

offsets
, 57, 60–61

“Carbon cowboys”
, 53–54

Carbon credits
, 50, 52, 56, 58

sellers
, 60, 62

Caring capitalism
, 10, 12

Cause-entrepreneurs
, 33

Charity organizations
, 37

Civic convention
, 93

Clandestine connections
, 73

Classical theorists
, 4

Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)
, 50

Clearinghouse Platform
, 177

Clients
, 128, 135–137

Climate Action Network (CAN)
, 50

Commercial dairy trusts
, 116

Commodification
, 9, 71

Commodity production
, 88

Communication
, 58–59

scholars
, 154

Company community
, 95

Competitive market
, 31

Conducive to market efficiency
, 93

Confederation of Medium-Sized Companies (CAME)
, 73

Conflicts
, 112

Consensus Statement
, 41

Constitute economic action
, 133

Consumers
, 152

investment model
, 156

Contestation
, 69–72, 188

arenas of
, 189–192

in court
, 196–197

in political field
, 193

on streets and in public opinion
, 193

Contested “voluntary” carbon market, features of
, 52–54

Contested commodities
, 32

Contested distribution via discount stores
, 119–122

Contested illegality
, 71

Contested markets
, 32, 55

contrasting examples
, 34–43

theory
, 32–34

Contracts
, 58

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITIES)
, 71

Conventional cooperatives
, 116

Conventional financial valuations
, 133

Conventional investors
, 129

Conventional supermarkets
, 119

Conventional-banking system
, 142–143

Conventions
, 90–91

“Cooling-down” devices
, 13

Coping strategies
, 112

Copyrights
, 68–70

Corporate culture
, 124n7

Corporate social responsibility (CSR)
, 7, 108

Corporate sustainability
, 108

“Cost explosion”
, 95

Cost factors
, 95–96

Cost-benefit arguments
, 94–95

Counterfeit
, 70

clothing
, 13

Counterfeiting
, 69–70

Court, contestation in
, 196–197

Crime
, 68

Criminalization
, 71–72

Critical management studies
, 7

Critical moments
, 90–91

Criticisms
, 91, 120, 134–135

of ethical banking
, 135–137

Cultivating moral indignation
, 161–162

Cultural agents
, 154

Cultural and structural transformation of economy
, 95–96

Cultural change
, 131

Customers
, 128

De-commodification
, 9

Deliveroo
, 188

Denial of funds
, 161

Deposits
, 128

Digital crowd
, 191

Digital economy
, 187–188

arenas of contestation
, 189–192

contestation in court
, 196–197

contestation in political field
, 193–195

contestation on streets and in public opinion
, 193

legality and legitimacy of digital platforms
, 188–189

research and fieldwork
, 192

trials as political and moral events
, 197–199

Digital platforms, legality and legitimacy of
, 188–189

Digitalization
, 18

Disability insurance as moral entrepreneur
, 96–98

Disabled people
, 88–89

Disabled workers
, 90

Discrimination
, 90–91

“Disruptive” digital platforms
, 5

Diverse commodities
, 68–69

Domestic convention
, 97

Domestic order of worth
, 93

Double face of ecopreneurship
, 116–119

“Double game” strategy
, 109, 114–115

playing
, 119–122

Durban Group for Climate Justice
, 53

E-hailing applications
, 192

“Early detection and intervention”
, 96

“Eco-symbolic” capital
, 114

Ecological

commitments
, 128

modernization
, 108

Ecology
, 116

Economic

actors
, 168

anthropology
, 8–11

boom
, 94

crisis
, 94

economy
, 11, 113–114, 117, 119, 121

expansion
, 130

habitus
, 122

logics
, 120

profitability
, 128

quality of sustainable investments
, 129

rationality
, 90–91

reality
, 99

sociology
, 8–11, 68, 131–132

Economics of Convention framework (EC framework)
, 90

Economy

cultural and structural transformation of
, 95–96

of social
, 112–115

Ecopreneurs
, 14, 116, 123n1

Ecopreneurship
, 108

double face of
, 116–119

in moralized markets
, 111

Embodying rebel ethos
, 160–161

Emerging aspirations and moral justifications
, 73

aspirations and knowledge
, 76–78

experience of state
, 80–81

shared beliefs
, 78–80

Emotions
, 61–63

Employees
, 77

Employers

amoral economic self-interest
, 90–91

role
, 89

Employment quota
, 88–89

Enabling role of morality
, 8–9

Enlightened altruism
, 42

Entrepreneurs
, 77–78

Environmental, social, and governance criteria (ESG criteria)
, 136–137, 169

Episodic event coverage
, 155, 161

Episodic exemplar coverage
, 155, 161

Epistemological breach
, 112

Ethical

dimension of human life
, 69–70

investment
, 129

justifiable business policies
, 133–134

self-commitment
, 143

self-obligation
, 130

Ethical banks
, 128

customer base
, 143–144

data and methods
, 134–135

development of ethical-banking business
, 128–131

ethical-banking paradox
, 142–144

institutional guidelines, clients, and criticisms of ethical banking
, 135–137

justifications and conflicts in ethical banking
, 138–142

market moralities
, 131–134

Ethos
, 154, 160, 172

rhetoric
, 163

Ethos Engagement Pool (EEP)
, 175

Explicit market moralization process
, 12

Exploitation
, 10

Fairness of finance issue
, 163

Federal eco-label “Bio-Siegel”
, 115–116

Federal Office of Social Insurance
, 91

Fictitious commodity
, 88

Field theory
, 112

Financial crisis
, 128

Financial incentives
, 95

Financial market authorities (FMA)
, 156, 158, 160

moral struggle between Waldviertler and
, 155–157

Financial markets
, 131

Financial Times, The
, 53

Financial-market activities
, 137

Foodora.com
, 188

Formulating interpretation
, 135

Fragmentation
, 111, 115

Française des Jeux
, 39

Free spaces
, 168

creating for mobilization
, 171–173

for mobilizing challengers
, 182

Freedom
, 92

Funeral services
, 55–56

Gambling
, 35, 38

Games of chance
, 39

GEA
, 156

Gemeinschaftsbank für Leihen und Schenken Bank (GLS Bank)
, 129

Geneva-based pension fund
, 172

Germany

German ethical banks
, 128

German market for organic dairies
, 115–116

redistributive state-funded pension system
, 129

Global financial crisis
, 128–129, 136

Global sign wars
, 152

Global sustainable stock indices
, 129

Gold Standard (GS)
, 60

Good deeds and maximization of profit
, 116–119

“Grayball” (software tool)
, 196

Greenhouse gas (GHG)

assessments
, 56–57

emissions
, 50

protocol
, 56

Greenpeace
, 50, 64

Guardian, The
, 53

Habitus
, 124n7

Health management
, 95–96

Holistic approach
, 117

Homo oeconomicus
, 94, 113

Human organs
, 32, 34

Human resources managers
, 91

Hybrid organizations
, 108, 114

IL approaches on
, 109–112

Illegal markets
, 68, 70–72

Illegality
, 68

Illegalization
, 71–72

Illegitimate legality
, 189

In-house social workers
, 91

Individual firms
, 178–180

Industrial convention
, 98

Institutional

complexity
, 109–110

entrepreneurs
, 7

entrepreneurship
, 111

guidelines
, 135–137

plurality
, 109–110

Institutional logics (IL)
, 108

approaches on hybrid organizations
, 109–112

Insurance
, 93–96

“Integration before pensions”
, 96–97

“Integration instead of pensions”
, 96–97

Interconnectedness
, 78–79

Interconnection
, 77–78

International Carbon Reduction and Offset Alliance (ICROA)
, 65n13

Internet
, 154

Interpersonal agreement
, 68–69

Interventionism
, 92

Interviewees
, 117

Investments
, 128

foundations
, 183

Istanbul Declaration
, 36

iTaxi
, 192

Job retention
, 99

Justifications and conflicts in ethical banking
, 138–142

Knowledge
, 76–78, 135

Kyoto protocol
, 50, 52, 65n1

Kyoto surprise
, 50

La Salada marketplace
, 70, 72

Labor law
, 99

Legal framework
, 39

Legal markets
, 68

Legal rules
, 43

Legality
, 69

of digital platforms
, 188–189

Legalization
, 69

Legitimacy

of digital platforms
, 188–189

legitimate illegality
, 189

legitimize economic decisions
, 108

Lending and investment decisions
, 136–137

Liberal policy of occupational integration
, 92

Liberal principle of “voluntariness”
, 89–90

“Lifestyle of health and sustainability”
, 137

Loan and investment markets
, 131

Logos
, 154

rhetoric
, 163

Market demands
, 117

for disabled labor
, 96–97

“Market pricing” algorithm
, 191

Markets (see also Moralized markets)
, 4–6, 68

complementing function
, 130

creation process
, 68–69

devices
, 39–43

enabling function
, 130

expansion
, 16–18

intensification
, 17

limiting
, 130

market-accompanying morality
, 10

moralities
, 131–134

segmentation
, 121–122

structures
, 132

value
, 98

Media
, 155

coverage
, 155

mass
, 153, 157

Media recruitment into moral struggles
, 157–158

cultivating moral indignation
, 161–162

embodying rebel ethos
, 160–161

reversing moral standards
, 158–160

Micro-credit institution
, 73

Micro-level negotiation processes
, 132

Mobilization, creating free space for
, 171–173

Moment
, 69, 71

critical
, 90–91

watershed
, 178

Moral

behavior
, 168–169

crusaders
, 153, 164

disputes
, 33

duty
, 96

embeddedness
, 8

integrity
, 118, 121–122

justifications
, 132

legitimacy
, 69

markets
, 21n2

nature of labor
, 88–89

objections
, 34–36

shock
, 161

turn
, 5–7

vocabulary
, 89

work
, 20

Moral economy
, 6, 10–11

of digital crowd
, 190

of digital platforms
, 188–189

Moral entrepreneurs(hip)
, 13, 153, 156, 181–182

activists as
, 168–183

brands as
, 152–164

disability insurance as
, 96–98

Moral struggles
, 4, 152

in and around markets
, 13–15

in markets
, 16–18

markets and morality
, 4–6

media recruitment into
, 157–162

moral orders
, 15–19

around morally contested markets
, 13

objects
, 15–16

within organizations and market fields
, 13

political struggles
, 18–19

research on morality in and around markets
, 6–11

sociology of morality
, 11–12

theoretical approaches
, 19–20

between Waldviertler and FMA
, 155–157

Morality
, 4–6, 70–72

research on morality in and around markets
, 6–11

Moralization
, 14, 16–18, 169, 182–183

contested limits of social responsibility
, 98–100

data and methods
, 91

disability insurance as moral entrepreneur
, 96–98

of labor
, 89

persistence and transformation of vocabulary of voluntary responsibility
, 93–96

social responsibility against “state interventionism”
, 92–93

theoretical framework
, 90–91

Moralized markets
, 21n2, 108

capturing opposing logics
, 112–115

double face of ecopreneurship
, 116–119

empirical case
, 115–116

organization, multiple logics
, 109–112

playing double game
, 119–122

Motor racing, organization of
, 33

Movements
, 8

activism
, 10

Mozilla (web browser)
, 152

Mutual dependency
, 77–78

Mytaxi
, 192

National Lottery
, 39

Neo-institutionalist scholars
, 109–110

Nephrectomy
, 35

Newspapers
, 154

“Non-contractual” element of contracts
, 8

Non-disabled people
, 88–89

Non-economic values
, 113

Non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
, 52, 189

Non-state actors
, 189

Normative orientations
, 130

Normative self-regulation
, 131

Nuclear energy
, 130

“Objectivized” knowledge
, 135

Occupational social insurance schemes
, 99

Opposing logics
, 112–115

Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network
, 42

Organization studies
, 6–8

Organizational routines
, 155

Pathological gambling
, 39

Pathos
, 154, 161–162

rhetoric
, 163

“Patriarch” protecting weak members
, 93

Pension funds
, 129, 172–173, 182

Persistence of vocabulary of voluntary responsibility
, 93–96

Pesticide industry
, 130

Philip Pettit’s theory
, 46n2

Pierre Bourdieu’s field theoretical concept
, 109

Platform capitalism
, 187

Polanyian “double movement thesis”
, 34

Political contestation
, 5

Political field, contestation in
, 193–195

Political struggles
, 18–19

Practice theories
, 19–20

Practice-based view of moral markets
, 69–70

Prevention measures
, 40

Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI)
, 177

Private politics
, 168

Process model
, 182–183

Profit maximization
, 113

Profit-oriented customers
, 142

Property
, 69

“Protector of shareholders”
, 180

Protest
, 153

mediation
, 154–155

paradigm
, 155

rhetoric
, 153–154

Protestainment
, 153

as branding strategy
, 162–164

Provocative blaming
, 162

Public agents
, 152

Public criticism
, 94

Public opinion
, 190

contestation on streets and in
, 193

“Reconciling irreconcilable”
, 108

Reconciling logics
, 114–115

Reflecting interpretation
, 135

Regulations securing trademarks
, 69

Regulatory conversations
, 197

Relational work
, 13, 51

controlling clients’ communication with contract
, 58–60

emotions
, 61–63

features of contested “voluntary” carbon market
, 52–54

as market device
, 54–55

recruiting client
, 55–57

Reputation
, 121–122

Responsibility
, 92

Responsible investment (RI)
, 128

Rethinking process
, 161

Reverse knowledge diffusion processes
, 163

Reversing moral standards
, 158–160

Rhetoric analysis
, 154

Rhetorical strategies
, 152–153, 158

Rules of exchange
, 32–33

Sanitarization of social problems
, 44

Savings Club model
, 156, 158

Screening process
, 139

Self-interest
, 113

Self-regulating market economy
, 88

Self-responsibility
, 93

Sewing machine
, 76

Shareholder activism
, 174

Shareholder resolutions
, 175, 177

Sharing economy
, 187–188, 194–195

Shoe rebel
, 156, 161

Single legitimate principle
, 130

Social

commitments
, 128

and cultural processes
, 90–91

entrepreneurship
, 108

groups
, 43

insurance
, 92

interactions
, 32

movements
, 10, 20, 133, 153–154

process
, 69, 71

salary
, 93–94

transfers
, 88

Social responsibility
, 98–100

of employers
, 89

against state interventionism
, 92–93

Socially responsible investment (SRI)
, 128, 144n2, 172

Socio-economic context
, 72

Sociological perspective
, 131–132

Sociology of morality
, 11–12

State interventionism
, 92–93

Stereotypes
, 90–91

Studies investigate commodities
, 68

Supervisors
, 91, 99–100

Surge pricing
, 190

Sustainability
, 115

entrepreneurship
, 108

studies
, 119

Sustainable investment
, 129, 140

Sweatshop-based market for garments
, 72

Sweatshop-produced garments
, 76

Swiss blue chips index
, 171, 181

Swiss Market Index
, 171

Swiss pension funds
, 171

Switzerland disability insurance
, 92

Symbolic capital
, 113

Symbolic economy
, 113–114

Symbolic logics
, 120

Tax rules
, 39

Taxation
, 41

Technological innovations
, 188

Thematic coverage
, 155, 159–160

Theoretical notion
, 169

“Trade milk and dairy products”
, 121

Trademark laws
, 69

and property rights
, 71

Transformation of vocabulary of voluntary responsibility
, 93–96

“Travel ban”
, 200n1

Trials as political and moral events
, 197–199

TV stations
, 154

Uber
, 188, 190–193, 196–197, 200n1

“Uber hunter” (Łowca Uberów)
, 196

Uberization
, 188

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
, 50

UOKiK
, 194–195, 198

Valuation

of labor
, 89

processes
, 10

Verified Carbon Standard (VCS)
, 60

Voluntariness principle
, 92

Voluntary carbon offset market
, 51

Voluntary responsibility
, 93–96

social responsibility
, 98–99

Vulnerable populations
, 13, 32–33, 36–38, 44–45, 65n1

Waldviertler (shoe brand)
, 155

moral struggle between FMA and
, 155–157

Warsaw taxi market
, 192

Watershed moment
, 178

WWF
, 50