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Theorizing Modern Society as an Inverted Reality: How Critical Theory and Indigenous Critiques of Globalization Must Learn From Each Other

Globalization, Critique and Social Theory: Diagnoses and Challenges

ISBN: 978-1-78560-247-4, eISBN: 978-1-78560-246-7

ISSN: 0278-1204

Publication date: 6 November 2015

Abstract

Originality/value

An effort to engender a process of reciprocal engagement between one of the early traditions of critiquing modern societies and a more recent development originating in populations and parts of the world that historically have been the subject of both constructive and destructive modernization processes.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Michelle Christian, Lawrence Hazelrigg, and Daniel Krier for helpful comments on various versions of this paper, Rhiannon Leebrick for excellent formal and substantive suggestions on how to clarify the overall argument of the paper, Lain Myers-Brown for a very close reading of the final version that improved the grammar and style, and Enkeshi Thom for pointing out two major deficits in the frame of the overall argument.

Citation

Jalata, A. and Dahms, H.F. (2015), "Theorizing Modern Society as an Inverted Reality: How Critical Theory and Indigenous Critiques of Globalization Must Learn From Each Other", Globalization, Critique and Social Theory: Diagnoses and Challenges (Current Perspectives in Social Theory, Vol. 33), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 75-133. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0278-120420150000033004

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2015 Emerald Group Publishing Limited