Chapter 6 Technology and students with disabilities: Does it solve all the problems

Current Issues and Trends in Special Education: Research, Technology, and Teacher Preparation

ISBN: 978-1-84950-954-1, eISBN: 978-1-84950-955-8

ISSN: 0270-4013

Publication date: 23 April 2010

Abstract

Technology, particularly for students with disabilities, is often viewed as “the great equalizer” (Wyer, 2001, p. 1). It is perceived as a means of providing access and opportunity, promoting independence, and encouraging empowerment (Edyburn, Higgins, & Boone, 2005b). Technology can greatly benefit students with disabilities and solve many of the challenges these students face. Perhaps, this was put most profusely by former Assistant Secretary of the United States Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs Judy Heumann, “For most of us, technology makes things easier. For a person with a disability, it makes things possible” (Edyburn et al., 2005b, p. xiii). The potential of technology is enormous for students with disabilities. For example, technology can provide a voice to those students who may not otherwise have one per their disability (i.e., AAC devices), read a text to a student who struggles with reading as a result of his/her disability (i.e., text-to-speech devices, screen readers, and Reading Pens), grant access to a computer and other electronic tools (i.e., switches and speech recognition), and offer low-tech devices such as pencil grips or lined paper to aid students in writing.

Citation

Bouck, E.C. (2010), "Chapter 6 Technology and students with disabilities: Does it solve all the problems", Obiakor, F.E., Bakken, J.P. and Rotatori, n.F. (Ed.) Current Issues and Trends in Special Education: Research, Technology, and Teacher Preparation (Advances in Special Education, Vol. 20), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 91-104. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0270-4013(2010)0000020009

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