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G.H. Mead, Morality, and Sociality: An Interactionist Reading of The Man in the High Castle

Radical Interactionism and Critiques of Contemporary Culture

ISBN: 978-1-83982-029-8, eISBN: 978-1-83982-028-1

ISSN: 0163-2396

Publication date: 30 April 2021

Abstract

This article combines Mead's notion of sociality with his implicit theory of morality. Specifically, it uses Mead's emphasis on temporality to analyze decisions made by key characters in the cinematic adaptation (Amazon TV) of Philip Dick's novel, The Man in the High Castle. Using a selective and subversive method to read into this adaptation, I regard Mead's view of morality as complex and as distinguishing between a morality in the specious present and a morality grounded in sociality. The paper links Mead and Mead's pragmatic emphasis to varieties of characters representing immoral foils (e.g., Nazis) and everyday lives to show how morality can emerge from a variety of standpoints, locating Mead's position as distinct from moral absolutism and moral relativity.

Keywords

Citation

Katovich, M.A. (2021), "G.H. Mead, Morality, and Sociality: An Interactionist Reading of The Man in the High Castle ", Denzin, N.K., Salvo, J. and Chen, S.-L.S. (Ed.) Radical Interactionism and Critiques of Contemporary Culture (Studies in Symbolic Interaction, Vol. 52), Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 35-52. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0163-239620210000052003

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

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