Editorial

R. Ian Campbell (Design School, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK)

Rapid Prototyping Journal

ISSN: 1355-2546

Article publication date: 18 January 2016

Citation

Campbell, R.I. (2016), "Editorial", Rapid Prototyping Journal, Vol. 22 No. 1. https://doi.org/10.1108/RPJ-12-2015-0182

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited


Editorial

Article Type: From: Rapid Prototyping Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1

Welcome to the 22nd volume of the Rapid Prototyping Journal (RPJ). As usual, there will be six issues in this volume, but in a departure from previous practice, these six issues will not all contain the same number of articles. Due to an increasing number of submissions, a “backlog” of accepted papers has developed, and we are endeavouring to reduce this more quickly by “front-loading” the volume. Therefore, the first two issues will contain around 20 articles, the middle two around 15 and the last two around 10. This will bring the total number of articles in the 2016 volume to around 90, which is an increase of approximately 14 per cent over the 2015 volume. This increase will contribute further towards reducing the backlog, and by the end of 2016, authors should not be waiting so long to see their papers in print. We also want to ensure that as well as growing in size, the RPJ is growing in quality. The increasing rate of submissions has been coupled with a rise in the rejection rate for papers, which is currently running at over 40 per cent. We are attempting to ensure that only high-quality and high-impact papers will be published, and that this will hopefully be reflected in an even higher impact factor. We realise that this can sometimes be seen to have a negative effect for researchers working in more specialised areas, but the number and range of journals now published should mean that they will be able to find alternative outlets for their work. We are also trying to improve the whole review process for authors, so that they can get easier access to information on the status of their manuscript.

I would like to finish on a more personal note. My 22 years of working in the field of additive manufacturing has enabled me to travel to different countries and to meet many and varied people. I think this must be the most enjoyable aspect of the international travel that is associated with my work. I have occasionally had the joy of bringing my family with me on some of these “excursions”. Recently, speaking at a three-dimensional (3D) Printing seminar in Stockholm had the unexpected consequence of my wife and me dining with royalty. The seminar was organised by the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA), and was followed the next day by the organisation’s annual meeting and a banquet at Stockholm City Hall. Both of these events were attended by their Royal Highnesses Prince Carl Philip and Princess Sofia of Sweden. We had the pleasure of being introduced to the royal couple, and of having dinner with them (and several hundred other guests). It was the first time I had attended a “white tie” event, and I must admit that I felt a little out of my depth. However, we had a wonderful time and I would like to thank everyone at the IVA for making this possible, a truly memorable occasion.

R. Ian Campbell