Police stressors and health: a state-of-the-art review

John M. Violanti (The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA)
Luenda E. Charles (Health Effects Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA)
Erin McCanlies (Health Effects Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA)
Tara A. Hartley (Health Effects Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA)
Penelope Baughman (Health Effects Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA)
Michael E. Andrew (Health Effects Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA)
Desta Fekedulegn (Health Effects Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA)
Claudia C. Ma (Health Effects Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA)
Anna Mnatsakanova (Health Effects Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA)
Cecil M. Burchfiel (Health Effects Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA)

Policing: An International Journal

ISSN: 1363-951X

Publication date: 20 November 2017

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a state-of-the-art review on the topic of police stressors and associated health outcomes. Recent empirical research is reviewed in the areas of workplace stress, shift work, traumatic stress, and health. The authors provide a comprehensive table outlining occupational exposures and related health effects in police officers.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of recent empirical research on police stress and untoward psychological and physiological health outcomes in police officers.

Findings

The results offer a conceptual idea of the empirical associations between stressful workplace exposures and their impact on the mental and physical well-being of officers.

Research limitations/implications

A key limitation observed in prior research is the cross-sectional study design; however, this serves as a motivator for researchers to explore these associations utilizing a longitudinal study design that will help determine causality.

Originality/value

This review provides empirical evidence of both mental and physical outcomes associated with police stress and the processes involved in both. Research findings presented in this paper are based on sound psychological and medical evidence among police officers

Keywords

Citation

John M. Violanti, Luenda E. Charles, Erin McCanlies, Tara A. Hartley, Penelope Baughman, Michael E. Andrew, Desta Fekedulegn, Claudia C. Ma, Anna Mnatsakanova and Cecil M. Burchfiel (2017) "Police stressors and health: a state-of-the-art review", Policing: An International Journal, Vol. 40 No. 4, pp. 642-656

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DOI

: https://doi.org/10.1108/PIJPSM-06-2016-0097

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © Published 2017

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