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Fatty acid profile of wild edible and cultivated mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus, Amanita spp and Termitomyces microcarpus)

Patrick Ogwok (Department of Food Technology, Kyambogo University, Kampala, Uganda)
Robert Muyinda (Department of Animal Production and Management, Busitema University, Tororo, Uganda and Department of Food Technology, Kyambogo University, Kampala, Uganda)
Henriettah Nakisozi (Department of Food Technology, Kyambogo University, Kampala, Uganda)
Michael Bamuwamye (Natural Chemotherapeutics Research Institute, Ministry of Health, Kampala, Uganda and Department of Food Technology, Kyambogo University, Kampala, Uganda)

Nutrition & Food Science

ISSN: 0034-6659

Article publication date: 8 May 2017

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate fat content and fatty acid profile of cultivated (Pleurotus ostreatus) and wild edible mushrooms (Amanita spp and Termitomyces microcarpus).

Design/methodology/approach

Pleurotus ostreatus was grown in soil and on cotton seed husks in mushroom growing rooms at Busitema University, Uganda. T. microcarpus and Amanita spp were collected from the wild. Freshly harvested mushrooms were dried at 60°C for 48 h in a hot air oven. Oil was extracted using a Clevenger apparatus. Fatty acid analysis was done using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

Findings

Fat content ranged between 0.24 and 5.23 per cent. Variation was noted between P. ostreatus grown in soil and on cotton seed husks (p = 0.0090). Similarly, Amanita spp and T. microcarpus had differing fat contents (p = 0.0098). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) predominated over saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). Linoleic acid (LA) was the most abundant fatty acid (FA) (30.91 to 54.35 per cent). It varied between Amanita spp and T. microcarpus (p = 0.0001) but not between substrates (p = 0.1891). Ratios of PUFA/SFA, MUFA/SFA and PUFA/MUFA were within the desirable ranges. Omega-6 FA/ω-3 FA ratio was higher than that recommended for a healthy diet. However, the low amount of fat in mushrooms suppresses the negative effects of a high ω-6 FA/ω-3 FA ratio.

Originality/value

Information on FA profile of cultivated and wild edible mushrooms will provide a basis for commercial exploitation of the cultivated mushrooms. This work showed that P. ostreatus, Amanita spp and T. microcarpus are healthy foods with regard to the low fat content and high amounts of LA.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The study was supported by Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) Uganda for which the authors are grateful. They also acknowledge all the members of staff Chemiphar (Uganda) Limited for technical support.

Declaration of interest: The authors had no conflicts of interest to declare.

Citation

Ogwok, P., Muyinda, R., Nakisozi, H. and Bamuwamye, M. (2017), "Fatty acid profile of wild edible and cultivated mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus, Amanita spp and Termitomyces microcarpus)", Nutrition & Food Science, Vol. 47 No. 3, pp. 357-368. https://doi.org/10.1108/NFS-08-2016-0122

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017, Emerald Publishing Limited