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Sand mining and land-based livelihood security in two selected districts in the Central Region of Ghana

Nana Amma Anokye (Department of Environment, Governance and Sustainable Development (DEGSuD), School for Development Studies, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana)
John Victor Mensah (Department of Environment, Governance and Sustainable Development (DEGSuD), School for Development Studies, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana)
Harriet Muriel Dzifa Potakey (Department of Environment, Governance and Sustainable Development (DEGSuD), School for Development Studies, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana)
Janet Serwah Boateng (Department of Environment, Governance and Sustainable Development (DEGSuD), School for Development Studies, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana)
David Wellington Essaw (Department of Environment, Governance and Sustainable Development (DEGSuD), School for Development Studies, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana)
Emmanuel Yamoah Tenkorang (Department of Environment, Governance and Sustainable Development (DEGSuD), School for Development Studies, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana)

Management of Environmental Quality

ISSN: 1477-7835

Article publication date: 8 June 2022

Issue publication date: 17 January 2023

181

Abstract

Purpose

Globally, rapid urbanisation characterised by increasing demand for housing and infrastructure needs has resulted in sand mining. In Ghana, sand mining can create or destroy the livelihoods of people in urban and rural areas. This paper examines the interaction between sand mining and land-based livelihood security in Awutu Senya District (ASD) and Awutu Senya East Municipality (ASEM).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on pragmatism philosophy, the study used a mixed methods approach to collect quantitative data and qualitative data from 431 household heads, ten core staff of the Assemblies, five traditional leaders, two tipper truck drivers' associations and ten farmer groups. Statistical Product and Service Solutions, version 21 and NVivo 12 facilitated quantitative data analysis and qualitative data analysis, respectively.

Findings

The study revealed that sand mining had different consequences on land-based livelihood security. Some block makers and truck drivers acknowledged positive effects of sand mining on their livelihoods while the majority of the household respondents and other key informants claimed that sand mining had negative effects on their livelihoods.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on two selected local government areas in Ghana. Therefore, the results may be generalised on the country with caution because local government areas have different characteristics. Further research is needed to contact the customers of sand in Accra.

Originality/value

This study provides new insight into the connections between sand mining and people's livelihood security in two local government areas. It also introduces a novel idea of collaboration among stakeholders to address negative effects associated with unsustainable sand mining.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Funding: The research was funded by the School for Development Studies and the Directorate of Research, Innovation and Consultancy, University of Cape Coast.

Citation

Anokye, N.A., Mensah, J.V., Potakey, H.M.D., Boateng, J.S., Essaw, D.W. and Tenkorang, E.Y. (2023), "Sand mining and land-based livelihood security in two selected districts in the Central Region of Ghana", Management of Environmental Quality, Vol. 34 No. 1, pp. 21-36. https://doi.org/10.1108/MEQ-11-2021-0263

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited

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