To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

Examining the association between government-sponsored product ratings and firm political participation

David E. Cavazos (Department of Management, College of Business, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA)
Matthew Rutherford (Department of Management, College of Business, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA)

Journal of Strategy and Management

ISSN: 1755-425X

Article publication date: 15 May 2017

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply firm aspiration theory to explore how firms respond to government product ratings.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal examination of nine automobile manufacturers during National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration crash tests in the USA.

Findings

Firms take specific external actions to influence the political mechanisms that support ranking schemes when product ratings are below those of rivals and when previously highly rated products decline. In addition, firms receiving rankings above those of their competitors are found to be less likely to take such action, even when their overall ratings declined. Similarly, firms seeing improvements in previously low-rated products will take fewer actions aimed at influencing the political mechanisms that support rating schemes.

Originality/value

The primary contribution of this research is in establishing when firm product ratings will result in actions to influence external ratings criteria. Previous research has shown that firms respond to organizational ratings by taking action aimed at improving subsequent performance. The current research builds on such work by applying aspiration theory in an effort to predict and explain when and why certain ratings will attract firm attention to the external mechanisms that support such ratings.

Keywords

Citation

Cavazos, D.E. and Rutherford, M. (2017), "Examining the association between government-sponsored product ratings and firm political participation", Journal of Strategy and Management, Vol. 10 No. 2, pp. 134-147. https://doi.org/10.1108/JSMA-01-2016-0005

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017, Emerald Publishing Limited