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Mobile banking and AI-enabled mobile banking: The differential effects of technological and non-technological factors on digital natives’ perceptions and behavior

Elizabeth Manser Payne (School of Business, Marian University, Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin, USA and Department of Marketing, University of Wisconsin Whitewater College of Business and Economics, Whitewater, Wisconsin, USA)
James W. Peltier (Department of Marketing, University of Wisconsin Whitewater College of Business and Economics, Whitewater, Wisconsin, USA)
Victor A. Barger (Department of Marketing, University of Wisconsin Whitewater College of Business and Economics, Whitewater, Wisconsin, USA)

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing

ISSN: 2040-7122

Article publication date: 10 October 2018

Issue publication date: 16 October 2018

4401

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid growth of technology, including artificial intelligence (AI), in the banking industry has played a disrupting role in traditional banking channels. This study aims to investigate factors that influence the attitudes and perceptions of digital natives pertaining to mobile banking and comfort interacting with AI-enabled mobile banking activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 218 digital natives. This paper uses multivariate regression and two separate multiple regression analyses to examine the differential effects of technology-based (i.e. attitudes toward AI, relative advantage, perceived trust and security in specific mobile banking activities) and non-technology based (i.e. need for service, quality of service) factors on mobile banking usage and AI-enabled mobile banking services.

Findings

This study identifies determining factors for mobile banking and AI-enabled mobile banking services. Results indicate a divide in how digital natives perceive relative advantage between our two dependent variables. Consistent with previous studies, the relative advantage construct has the most impact on mobile banking usage. However, relative advantage was not significant for AI-enabled mobile banking, suggesting an extra layer of complexity that goes beyond convenient fast banking.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is that it does not incorporate age groups outside of digital natives. Further research is needed to test for differential effects between age groups. In addition, the discovery of no significant impact of relative advantage on AI mobile banking warrants more research on the similarities and differences between mobile banking and AI-enabled mobile banking.

Practical implications

To better appeal to digital natives, it is suggested that the banking industry emphasize mobile banking’s anywhere/anytime access to financial accounts, as this is important to college-age customers who may not live near their local banking institution. Moreover, the paper suggests that improvement to mobile banking features for one-on-one interpersonal contact with bank employees is needed.

Originality/value

This study addresses the gap in the understanding of how digital natives perceive mobile banking in comparison to AI-enabled mobile banking services.

Keywords

Citation

Manser Payne, E., Peltier, J.W. and Barger, V.A. (2018), "Mobile banking and AI-enabled mobile banking: The differential effects of technological and non-technological factors on digital natives’ perceptions and behavior", Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, Vol. 12 No. 3, pp. 328-346. https://doi.org/10.1108/JRIM-07-2018-0087

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited

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