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Employee burnout: the dark side of performance-driven work climates

Franzisca Fastje (Department of Economics and Business, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands)
Jessica Mesmer-Magnus (Department of Management, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, North Carolina, USA)
Rebecca Guidice (Department of Management, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, North Carolina, USA)
Martha C. Andrews (Department of Management, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, North Carolina, USA)

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance

ISSN: 2051-6614

Article publication date: 12 August 2022

Issue publication date: 6 March 2023

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of “overtime norms” as a mediator between performance-driven work climates and employee burnout. This study also examines in-role performance and work engagement as moderators between high-performance climates and burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

A snowball sample of 214 full-time working adults from the United States participated via an online survey. Data were analyzed using SmartPLS and conditional process analysis.

Findings

Results from conditional process analyses suggest (1) performance-driven climates are positively related to burnout, (2) overtime norms mediate the relationship between performance-driven climates and burnout, and (3) in-role performance and work engagement moderate that relationship such that highly competent and engaged employees are less prone to stress and burnout.

Practical implications

These results highlight the dangers of performance-driven work climates on employee well-being. Trends toward extended work hours which can be exacerbated by technological advancements inevitably come at a cost. Managers and organizations should be careful not to prioritize work life over non-work life.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by identifying overtime norms as a mediator in the performance-driven work climate–burnout relationship. This study also identifies in-role performance and work engagement as resources that can reduce burnout.

Keywords

Citation

Fastje, F., Mesmer-Magnus, J., Guidice, R. and Andrews, M.C. (2023), "Employee burnout: the dark side of performance-driven work climates", Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, Vol. 10 No. 1, pp. 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1108/JOEPP-10-2021-0274

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited

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