To read this content please select one of the options below:

Investigating the effects of high-involvement climate and public service motivation on engagement, performance, and meaningfulness in the public sector

Alex J. Scrimpshire (College of Business and Economic Development, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, USA)
Bryan D. Edwards (Spears School of Business, Oklahoma State University Stillwater, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA)
Durand Crosby (Spears School of Business, Oklahoma State University Stillwater, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA)
Scott J. Anderson (Spears School of Business, Oklahoma State University Stillwater, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA)

Journal of Managerial Psychology

ISSN: 0268-3946

Article publication date: 16 November 2022

Issue publication date: 26 January 2023

1034

Abstract

Purpose

Despite much research, too many employees are disengaged in their work. As such, the present research uses a public sector setting to investigate variables (e.g. public service motivation and high-involvement climate) most likely associated with engagement and demonstrates a conceptual and empirical link to relevant outcomes (e.g. job performance and perceived meaningfulness).

Design/methodology/approach

Across a work week, the authors analyze the drivers and outcomes of public service employees’ engagement levels and the mediating effect of employee engagement.

Findings

Employee engagement mediated the positive relationship between the authors’ independent variables of public service motivation and high-involvement climate and our outcomes of supervisor-rated employee performance and meaningfulness. All direct and indirect effects were statistically significant and positive.

Research limitations/implications

The authors’ sample is a nonprofit government agency, so the results may lack generalizability. Although self-determination theory (SDT) guided their choice of variables and hypotheses, they did not measure the specific needs satisfaction (competence, relatedness, and autonomy) associated with the SDT.

Practical implications

Managers in public-service organizations may want to recruit those high in public service motivation and institute a high-involvement climate via manager skill training.

Originality/value

This article follows a meta-analysis call on SDT to test the impact of variables that fall under the identified form of autonomous motivation, and investigate their impact on engagement and other positive organizational outcomes (e.g. job performance and perceived meaningfulness). Additionally, the author followed calls to extend engagement research to focus on specific industry sectors, such as the public sector.

Keywords

Citation

Scrimpshire, A.J., Edwards, B.D., Crosby, D. and Anderson, S.J. (2023), "Investigating the effects of high-involvement climate and public service motivation on engagement, performance, and meaningfulness in the public sector", Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 38 No. 1, pp. 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMP-03-2021-0158

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited

Related articles