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Anticipated work discrimination scale: a chronic illness application

Alyssa McGonagle (Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United States)
Adam Roebuck (Roosevelt University Department of Psychology, Chicago, Illinois, USA)
Hannah Diebel (Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United States)
Justin Aqwa (Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United States)
Zachary Fragoso (Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United States)
Sarah Stoddart (Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan)

Journal of Managerial Psychology

ISSN: 0268-3946

Article publication date: 8 February 2016

Abstract

Purpose

The authors sought initial validity evidence for a measure of anticipated discrimination in the workplace using three samples of working adults with various chronic illnesses. The purpose of this paper is to propose a single factor structure, correlations with stigma dimensions, discriminant validity from similar scales, and incremental validity in predicting work-related outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Adults working at least 20 hours per week with various chronic illnesses (Sample 1 n=332, Sample 2 n=193, Sample 3 n=230) voluntarily completed an online survey. Structural equation modeling and hierarchical multiple regression were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Results supported the proposed single-factor structure, along with proposed correlations with strain, and job attitudes (job satisfaction, affective commitment, and both procedural justice). Discriminant validity was observed between anticipated discrimination and procedural justice perceptions and perceived impact on performance. The scale demonstrated incremental validity in predicting strain beyond the relevant controls in all three samples, although it only demonstrated incremental validity in predicting job satisfaction in Samples 1 and 3 and affective commitment in Sample 1.

Research limitations/implications

Study limitations include the use of single-source, cross-sectional data, omission of a non-stigmatized sample, and a deductive approach to item generation. Future research should attempt to validate the scale on other stigmatized worker populations.

Practical implications

Organizations may use this scale to monitor employees’ perceptions of anticipated discrimination and researchers may use it as a measure of a workplace stressor.

Originality/value

The vast majority of existing stigma and discrimination scales do not specifically address the workplace context. This study contributes to the literature by providing psychometric information for a workplace anticipated discrimination scale using samples from an under-represented worker population.

Keywords

Citation

McGonagle, A., Roebuck, A., Diebel, H., Aqwa, J., Fragoso, Z. and Stoddart, S. (2016), "Anticipated work discrimination scale: a chronic illness application", Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 31 No. 1, pp. 61-78. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMP-01-2014-0009

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2016, Emerald Group Publishing Limited