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Banking technology and cashless economy in selected Sub-Saharan African countries: does education matter?

Ese Urhie (Department of Economics and Development Studies, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria)
Ogechi Chiagozie Amonu (Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria)
Chiderah Mbah (Department of Economics and Development Studies, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria)
Olabanji Olukayode Ewetan (Department of Economics and Development Studies, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria)
Oluwatoyin Augustina Matthew (Department of Economics and Development Studies, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria)
Oluwasogo Adediran (Department of Economics and Development Studies, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria)
Oreoluwa Adesanya (Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria)
Adeleke Adekeye (Department of Banking and Finance, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria)

Journal of Money Laundering Control

ISSN: 1368-5201

Article publication date: 26 February 2021

Issue publication date: 31 July 2021

797

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the effect of banking technology [automated teller machine (ATM) and mobile cellular devices (MOBs)] and other traditional factors on the level of currency in circulation for a sample of 21 selected sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. It also assessed the mitigating effect of education on the relationship between banking technology and the cashless economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a panel data approach to design a cashless economy model with banking technology – ATM and MOBs – as well as their interaction with education as regressors.

Findings

This study finds that MOB is significant for promoting a cashless economy, whereas ATM is insignificant in sample SSA countries. The level of education and the number of bank branches were also found to be significant in promoting a cashless economy. The interaction between education and ATM was insignificant but negatively signed, whereas that between education and MOB was significant but had a positive sign.

Research limitations/implications

Non-availability of data restricted this work to a panel study of selected SSA countries. Subsequent studies should consider single-country case studies.

Practical implications

Findings from the study imply that for banking technology to drive a cashless economy effectively, education has to be improved.

Originality/value

The ratio of cash in circulation to total money supply was used as a measure of the cashless economy. The study also evaluated the moderating effect of education on banking technology.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors appreciate the financial support of Covenant University Center for Research, Innovation and Discovery (CUCRID) for the publication of this paper.

Citation

Urhie, E., Amonu, O.C., Mbah, C., Ewetan, O.O., Matthew, O.A., Adediran, O., Adesanya, O. and Adekeye, A. (2021), "Banking technology and cashless economy in selected Sub-Saharan African countries: does education matter?", Journal of Money Laundering Control, Vol. 24 No. 3, pp. 584-595. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMLC-10-2020-0122

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited

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