Peer-led self-management for people with severe mental disorders: an economic evaluation

Valentina Iemmi (Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK)
David Crepaz-Keay (Department of Empowerment and Social Inclusion, Mental Health Foundation, London, UK)
Eva Cyhlarova (Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK)
Martin Knapp (Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK)

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice

ISSN: 1755-6228

Publication date: 9 March 2015

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a peer-led self-management intervention for people with severe mental disorders.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a one-arm longitudinal study without control group. In all, 262 adults with (self-reported) severe mental disorders, who have used secondary mental health services and were living in the community were evaluated at three time points (baseline, six and 12 months). Socio-demographic data were collected at baseline. Wellbeing (Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale), functional living skills (Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II) and service use (Client Service Receipt Inventory) data were assessed over time.

Findings

Self-management for people with severe mental disorders improved wellbeing and health-promoting lifestyles. After an increase in the short term, costs appeared to decrease in the longer term, although this change was not statistically significant. Due to the lack of a control group, the authors are unable to attribute those changes to the intervention only. Nevertheless, the self-management intervention appears to warrant further attention on both wellbeing and economic grounds.

Originality/value

Self-management may facilitate recovery, helping to support people with severe mental disorders at no additional cost. Given recent emphasis on recovery, peer workers and self-management, this peer-led self-management approach for people with severe mental disorders appears to have potential.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

This project was funded by the Big Lottery Fund, Wales. The economic evaluation was made possible by a grant from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) School for Social Care Research. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR School for Social Care Research or the Department of Health/NIHR. The authors are grateful to Annette Bauer, Jennifer Beecham, Eva Bonin, Francesco D’Amico and Derek King for advice during the analysis.

Citation

Iemmi, V., Crepaz-Keay, D., Cyhlarova, E. and Knapp, M. (2015), "Peer-led self-management for people with severe mental disorders: an economic evaluation", The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, Vol. 10 No. 1, pp. 14-25. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMHTEP-08-2014-0019

Download as .RIS

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2015, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below

You may be able to access this content by logging in via Shibboleth, Open Athens or with your Emerald account.
To rent this content from Deepdyve, please click the button.
If you think you should have access to this content, click the button to contact our support team.