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Lived experience and clinical co-facilitation of a mental health literacy programme: qualitative exploration of satisfaction and factors supporting effective delivery

Talya Postelnik (Te Pou, Auckland, New Zealand)
Rhonda Robertson (Te Pou, Auckland, New Zealand)
Angela Jury (Te Pou, Auckland, New Zealand)
Heather Kongs-Taylor (Te Pou, Auckland, New Zealand)
Sarah Hetrick (Department of Psychological Medicine, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand)
Charito Tuason (Te Pou, Auckland, New Zealand)

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice

ISSN: 1755-6228

Article publication date: 19 November 2021

Issue publication date: 28 April 2022

191

Abstract

Purpose

Mental health literacy programmes can help reduce stigma towards people who experience mental health challenges. Co-facilitated mental health literacy programmes, delivered by a person with lived experience of mental health challenges in partnership with a person with clinical experience in mental health services, may further reduce stigma. This qualitative study aims to explore participants’ satisfaction with a co-facilitated mental health literacy programme and facilitator characteristics influencing satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used deidentified post-workshop evaluation data from 762 community mental health literacy programme participants (86% response rate). Thematic analysis of qualitative data used a general inductive approach.

Findings

Findings indicate high satisfaction with the co-facilitation model used to deliver a mental health literacy programme. Three key themes related to co-facilitation satisfaction: how participants perceived the co-facilitation model overall; the impact of having two facilitators that offered different knowledge and perspectives about mental health challenges; and the impact of personal stories shared. The personal stories shared by facilitators were perceived as bringing the workshop content to life and providing insights into people’s experiences and well-being journey. Key themes influencing co-facilitation satisfaction related to facilitator knowledge, skills, values and attitudes.

Practical implications

Findings indicate the positive impact of incorporating people’s lived experience into the design and delivery of mental health literacy programmes. Findings highlight key facilitator characteristics and support needs when recruiting facilitators to deliver programmes. This includes good facilitation skills alongside personal experiences.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first large study examining satisfaction with a co-facilitated mental health literacy programme for the general public.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Renee Torrington (MH101 lived experience facilitator) and Caro Swanson (principal advisor mental health and service user lead) for their review and feedback which has helped inform this paper.

The authors would like to thank everyone who completed MH101 programme evaluations which informed this work.Funding: Te Pou is funded by the Ministry of Health, New Zealand.

Conflict of interest statement: Te Pou and Blueprint for Learning are both part of The Wise Group and share resourcing, including joint management and governance. The authors alone are responsible for the content and writing of the paper.

Citation

Postelnik, T., Robertson, R., Jury, A., Kongs-Taylor, H., Hetrick, S. and Tuason, C. (2022), "Lived experience and clinical co-facilitation of a mental health literacy programme: qualitative exploration of satisfaction and factors supporting effective delivery", The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, Vol. 17 No. 3, pp. 288-303. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMHTEP-06-2021-0057

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited

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