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Development and dissemination of a core competency framework

Julian N. Trollor (Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia)
Claire Eagleson (Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia)
Janelle Weise (Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia)
Roderick McKay (Health Education and Training Institute (HETI) Higher Education, Sydney, Australia) (School of Psychiatry, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia)

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice

ISSN: 1755-6228

Article publication date: 10 July 2017

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and critique the methodology used to develop a core competency framework for mental health professionals working with people with an intellectual disability and co-occurring mental ill health.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-phase, multi-method design was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data, including a scoping survey, modified online Delphi, and consultation with multiple stakeholders. The implementation phase involved a launch forum and workshop, toolkit development, and evaluation strategy.

Findings

Results from the scoping survey and consultation process informed the development of a core competency framework with 11 domains. An accompanying toolkit was also developed with practical guidance to assist with the implementation of the core competencies. In total, 93 professionals attended the launch forum, and the framework has been downloaded 998 times during the first year it has been available.

Research limitations/implications

Detailed information specific to each profession cannot be included when a whole of workforce approach is used. The ways in which to use the framework in conjunction with other core competency frameworks is discussed.

Practical implications

This framework can be utilised by mental health workers including clinicians, managers, service developers, and educators, from multiple professional backgrounds. The approach taken can also be used by others to develop similar frameworks.

Originality/value

This is the first core competency framework, to the authors’ knowledge, specifically designed for public mental health professionals from varied backgrounds working with people with an intellectual disability. Consulting with multiple stakeholders, not just experts, elicited new information that may otherwise have been overlooked.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors thank members of the Project Advisory Group for their input and advice throughout the project. This project was funded by MH-Children and Young People, Mental Health Branch, NSW Ministry of Health (Core competency framework development and implementation); NHMRC Partnerships (consultation with people with an intellectual disability); and the work of the Chair, Intellectual Disability Mental Health, which is supported by core funding from NSW Government Family and Community Services, Ageing, Disability and Home Care and the Mental Health Branch, NSW Ministry of Health (consultation with family and support people). Julian N. Trollor receives external funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council; South Eastern Sydney Local Health District, Mental Health Branch and MH-Children and Young People, NSW Ministry of Health; and NSW Government Family and Community Services, Ageing, Disability and Home Care. Claire Eagleson, Julian N. Trollor and Roderick McKay do not receive external funding.

Citation

Trollor, J.N., Eagleson, C., Weise, J. and McKay, R. (2017), "Development and dissemination of a core competency framework", The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, Vol. 12 No. 4, pp. 237-248. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMHTEP-04-2017-0028

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017, Emerald Publishing Limited