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Recovery processes within peer provision: testing the CHIME model using a mixed methods design

Grace Zeng (Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University Bentley Campus, Perth, Australia)
Donna Chung (Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University Bentley Campus, Perth, Australia)

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice

ISSN: 1755-6228

Article publication date: 1 October 2020

Issue publication date: 1 October 2020

987

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies have pointed the need for more research, which explores how peer provision brings about change associated with recovery. This study aims to test Leamy’s framework, which consists of five recovery processes: connectedness, hope, identity, meaning and empowerment (also known as the CHIME framework) within the peer provision context.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed-methods study was completed in two stages. A total of 13 face-to-face interviews were conducted with peers and the transcripts were analysed thematically. A short online questionnaire was completed by 12 peers and analysed with both descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.

Findings

The participants spoke about the value of peer providers (PPs) in building connectedness, fostering hope and optimism, growing identity, enhancing meaning and empowerment (CHIME). However, their connectedness was hindered by external circumstances and the intrapersonal capacities of their PP.

Practical implications

The CHIME framework was useful in highlighting stages in which peers moved through their recovery and its corresponding PP involvement. PPs were also found to promote motivation, which was a key driver in their peers’ recoveries. Further research is needed to test frameworks that account for wider systemic issues and the role PPs play in enhancing motivation.

Originality/value

This study has identified the usefulness of the CHIME framework in describing peer provision. It contributes to our understanding of how peer provision can promote recovery in persons with mental health challenges. It lays the groundwork for future research into examining the role of peer provision in recovery and its distinctiveness from other forms of mental health support.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge the contribution of an Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship in supporting this research.They would also like to thank Dr Katrina Stratton for her involvement in the conceptualisation in this paper and Adjunct Professor Beverley McNamara for her input into editing the paper.

Citation

Zeng, G. and Chung, D. (2020), "Recovery processes within peer provision: testing the CHIME model using a mixed methods design", The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, Vol. 15 No. 5, pp. 287-302. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMHTEP-01-2020-0007

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2020, Emerald Publishing Limited

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